Skip to main content
This Date in NHL History

Aug. 14: Weber born in British Columbia

Plus: Rangers sign Abel; Hockey Hall of Fame member Kennedy dies

by John Kreiser @jkreiser7713 / NHL.com Managing Editor

THIS DATE IN HISTORY: Aug. 14

1985: Shea Weber, who has one of the hardest shots in NHL history, is born in Sicamous, British Columbia.

The Nashville Predators take Weber, a defenseman, in the second round (No. 49) of the 2003 NHL Draft. He makes the League as a 20-year-old in 2005-06 and quickly becomes known for his big shot, scoring 166 goals in his 11 seasons with Nashville. That includes two seasons with 23 goals (2008-09 and 2013-14) and one with 20 (2005-16). Weber also wins the hardest shot competition during All-Star Weekend in 2015 and 2016, exceeding 108 mph each time.

Weber, a two-time First-Team All-Star, appears to be a fixture in Nashville, but is traded to the Montreal Canadiens for defenseman P.K. Subban on June 29, 2016.

Video: Hardest Shot: Weber wins with 102.8 mph slapper

 

MORE MOMENTS

1926: The New York Rangers, preparing for their first season in the NHL, sign defenseman Clarence "Taffy" Abel, a native of Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan, who becomes the first U.S.-born player to earn a regular spot in the League. Abel, one of the biggest players of his era at 225 pounds, spends three seasons with the Rangers and is a member of their Stanley Cup-winning team in 1928 before being sold to the Chicago Blackhawks. He spends five seasons with Chicago and helps the Blackhawks win the Cup for the first time in 1934, then retires.

 

2009: Ted "Teeder" Kennedy, captain of the Toronto Maple Leafs from 1948-55 and a member of the Hockey Hall of Fame, dies at age 83. The Maple Leafs win the Stanley Cup five times during Kennedy's 14 seasons with Toronto; he leads all scorers during the run to the Cup in 1948 with eight goals and 14 points. Kennedy wins the Hart Trophy as MVP in 1954-55, his final full NHL season. He finishes his NHL career with 560 points (231 goals, 329 assists) in 696 games, and is inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1966.

View More