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Hockey Is For Everyone

Hockey Is For Everyone

Hockey Is For Everyone ambassadors named

All 31 teams will be represented to help NHL celebrate inclusion, diversity in the month of February

NHL.com @NHL

In support of their long-standing commitment to diversity and inclusion in hockey, the National Hockey League, the League's Member Clubs and the NHL Players' Association will spotlight a variety of community-related initiatives for Hockey Is For Everyone throughout the month of February.

Hockey Is For Everyone month reaffirms that the official policy of the sport is one of inclusion on the ice, in the locker rooms and in the stands. Around the hockey community, leagues and teams will celebrate the game's diversity and commitment to respect for all.

"I believe that the Hockey Is For Everyone initiative is important each year because many people, especially at a young age, are not usually comfortable pushing for inclusion," said Josh Pauls, the captain of the U.S. National Sled team competing in the 2018 PyeongChang Paralympics. "With the NHL and its partners putting it out there that everyone is welcome in the sport of hockey, it opens the door for people of different backgrounds to feel a part of a family that they may not have had in the past or in any other setting."

 

[RELATED: Hockey is for Everyone coverage | Calendar | Ambassadors]

 

Each NHL club has designated one player to be a Hockey Is For Everyone Ambassador, which means being a leader in the locker room and in the community on diversity, equality and inclusion. These players have agreed to lead the way in their markets and be an advocate for underrepresented, marginalized or disadvantaged communities; some will be featured in stories and public service announcements throughout the month.

The 31 Player Ambassadors will be joined by two NHL Officials -- Shandor Alphonso and Dave Jackson -- and six special ambassadors: SFC. Joseph Bowser, Harrison Browne, Angela James, Josh Pauls, Fred Sasakamoose and Harnarayan Singh.

Here are the HIFE ambassadors for each club:

Anaheim Ducks -- Corey Perry

Arizona Coyotes -- Oliver Ekman-Larsson

Boston Bruins -- Brad Marchand

Buffalo Sabres -- Ryan O'Reilly

Carolina Hurricanes -- Trevor van Riemsdyk

Columbus Blue Jackets -- Seth Jones

Calgary Flames -- Matt Stajan

Chicago Blackhawks -- Tommy Wingels

Colorado Avalanche -- Gabriel Landeskog

Dallas Stars -- Tyler Seguin

Detroit Red Wings -- Justin Abdelkader

Edmonton Oilers -- Jujhar Khaira

Florida Panthers -- Aaron Ekblad

Los Angeles Kings -- Dustin Brown

Minnesota Wild -- Charlie Coyle

Montreal Canadiens -- Andrew Shaw

Nashville Predators -- Kyle Turris

New Jersey Devils -- Andy Greene

New York Islanders -- Casey Cizikas

New York Rangers -- Mats Zuccarello

Ottawa Senators -- Dion Phaneuf

Philadelphia Flyers -- Claude Giroux

Pittsburgh Penguins -- Matt Murray

San Jose Sharks -- Chris Tierney

St. Louis Blues -- Carter Hutton

Tampa Bay Lightning -- Alex Killorn

Toronto Maple Leafs -- James van Riemsdyk

Vancouver Canucks -- Henrik Sedin

Vegas Golden Knights -- Pierre-Édouard Bellemare

Washington Capitals -- Braden Holtby

Winnipeg Jets -- Jacob Trouba

 

Here are the special ambassadors

Shandor Alphonso

An NHL linesman since 2014, Alphonso, of Trinidad-Jamaican descent, was an accomplished Junior hockey and University hockey player. Along with his role model Jay Sharrers, he is paving the way for future referees of color.

Dave Jackson

The longest-tenured NHL referee, having worked more than 1,500 games, Jackson brings a strong commitment to equality, inclusion and respect on the ice and with the NHL Officials Association, which he joined in 1989.

SFC. Joseph Bowser

A 14-year military veteran and Staff Assistant to the Secretary of the Army, Bowsen is a founding member of USA Warriors, an ice hockey program for wounded veterans. For Bowser and other warriors, hockey is playing a major role in their recovery, both physically and emotionally.

Harrison Browne

Browne plays in the National Women's Hockey League, and is the first openly transgender person in professional hockey. Browne is a trailblazer for the LGBTQ community, helping form the first-ever transgender policy in professional sports, supporting transmen and transwomen in their athletic participation.

Angela James

Widely considered the first superstar of modern women's hockey, James, who is multiracial and a pioneer for LGBTQ people in sports, began her hockey career playing with and against boys before her talents and efforts helped women's hockey flourish. James is one of the first females inducted into the IIHF Hall of Fame (2008), Canada's Sports Hall of Fame (2009) and the Hockey Hall of Fame (2010).

Josh Pauls

Pauls is the captain of the U.S. National Sled team who will be competing at the 2018 Paralympics. Though he had both legs amputated as an infant, Pauls grew up with dreams of becoming the first NHL goalie with no legs. Pauls joined the New York Rangers Junior Sled Hockey club at age 10, and by age 17 had won the gold medal in the Vancouver 2010 Paralympic Winter Games.

Fred Sasakamoose

The NHL's first Canadian Indigenous player, Sasakamoose was appointed to the prestigious Order of Canada in 2017. A residential school survivor who was born in Whitefish Lake, Saskatchewan (now Big River First Nation), he devotes his time to working with Indigenous youth and trying to help improve his community through sports.

Harnarayan Singh

The first-ever Sikh to do play-by-play of an NHL game in Punjabi and English, Singh, who has broadcast NHL games for a decade, is making the sport he loves more accessible to new Canadians and is a trailblazer for those who wish to work in hockey.

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