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This Date in NHL History

April 20: Raleigh scores back-to-back OT goals in Final

Plus: Beliveau has only playoff hat trick; Gretzky gets 300th postseason point

by John Kreiser @jkreiser7713 / NHL.com Managing Editor

THIS DATE IN HISTORY: April 20

1950: Don Raleigh becomes the first player in Stanley Cup Playoff history to score an overtime goal in back-to-back games during the Final when he beats Harry Lumley 1:38 into OT to give the New York Rangers a 2-1 victory against the Detroit Red Wings in Game 5 at Olympia Stadium. 

It comes two nights after Raleigh's goal at 8:34 of overtime gives the Rangers a series-tying 4-3 win.

"There's nothing more special than scoring an overtime goal in the Stanley Cup Finals. To score two of them in a row is almost beyond words. It's something that I'll never forget," Raleigh remembers more than a half-century later in the 2006 book "Game of My Life: The New York Rangers."

Raleigh's feat is unmatched until John LeClair of the Montreal Canadiens scores in overtime in consecutive games in the 1993 Final.

 

MORE MOMENTS

1958: The Canadiens equal an NHL record by winning the Stanley Cup for the third year in a row. Bernie Geoffrion scores twice and has an assist to help the Canadiens defeat the Boston Bruins 5-3 in Game 6 of the Final. Montreal matches the three consecutive Stanley Cup championships won by the Toronto Maple Leafs from 1946-47 through 1948-49.

 

1968: Jean Beliveau scores three goals in a Stanley Cup Playoff game for the first time in his career in the Canadiens' 4-1 victory against the Chicago Blackhawks in Game 2 of the Semifinals at the Forum. Beliveau ties the game midway through the first period, then scores two of Montreal's three power-play goals in the second against Denis DeJordy. It is the only playoff hat trick of Beliveau's career and it comes three years to the day after he earns his 100th playoff point in Montreal's 2-0 win against Chicago.

Video: Jean Beliveau's name is on Stanley Cup 17 times

 

1969: Bobby Orr scores his first playoff goal. He beats Rogie Vachon late in the third period to give the Bruins a 3-1 lead, and they hang for a series-tying 3-2 victory against the Canadiens at Boston Garden. The goal comes in his 12th career playoff game. Orr retires with 26 goals (and 92 points) in 74 NHL postseason games.

 

1992: Wayne Gretzky becomes the first player with 300 playoff points when he's credited with four assists for the Los Angeles Kings in an 8-5 victory against his former team, the Edmonton Oilers, in Game 2 of the Smythe Division Semifinals at the Great Western Forum in Inglewood, California. Gretzky finishes his NHL career with 382 points in the playoffs; 87 more than runner-up Mark Messier.

 

1993: The Pittsburgh Penguins set a record with their 13th consecutive playoff victory when they defeat the New Jersey Devils 7-0 at the Civic Arena in Game 2 of the Patrick Division Semifinals. Shawn McEachern scores twice, Ron Francis has four assists and Tom Barrasso makes 36 saves for his third career playoff shutout.

Video: Memories: Pens notch record 13th-straight playoff win

 

1997: Craig MacTavish of the Oilers, the last player to appear in an NHL game without a helmet, plays his final game in a 4-3 overtime win against the visiting Dallas Stars. Helmets are made mandatory in 1979-80, but a grandfather clause is included to permit players who don't wear them before the rule is enacted to remain helmetless. The Oilers score three times in the final four minutes of the third period, and Kelly Buchberger gets the winner at 9:15 of overtime.

 

2016: Jaromir Jagr of the Florida Panthers gets his 200th playoff point with a second-period assist in a series-tying 2-1 win against the New York Islanders in Game 4 of the Eastern Conference First Round at Barclays Center. Jagr finds Jonathan Huberdeau for a second-period power-play goal. Jagr is the fifth player in NHL history with 200 points in the playoffs.

 Video: FLA@NYI, Gm4: Jagr finds Purcell to open the scoring

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