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Super 16

Super 16: Stanley Cup winners in expansion era

Canadiens represented four times, Oilers three among best since 1967-68

by Dan Rosen @drosennhl / NHL.com Senior Writer

Super 16: Cup Winners

Super 16: Cup Winners

The Canadiens and Oilers top the list of the best post-expansion Cup winners in Super 16 Classic Edition, presented by New Amsterdam Vodka

  • 02:11 •

The NHL season has been paused since March 12 due to concerns surrounding the coronavirus, but the weekly Super 16 rolls on in a revamped form, looking at the history of the game. This week, it's the top 16 Stanley Cup championship teams from 1967 to the present day, the NHL expansion era.

The 1976-77 Montreal Canadiens were ranked first by 10 of the 13 participating staff members to finish as the No. 1 team.

The '76-77 Canadiens had nine future Hall of Fame players. They went 12-2 in the Stanley Cup Playoffs, including a four-game sweep of the Boston Bruins in the Stanley Cup Final. They hold the NHL record for most points in a regular season with 132 in 80 games (60-8-12 (ties)).

They were also the only team to be ranked by all 13 staff members.

Forty-four of the past 51 Stanley Cup winners received at least three voting points. It was so close that the 1980-81 New York Islanders and 1993-94 New York Rangers each missed being in the Super 16 by one voting point.

The Edmonton Oilers are represented four times and the Canadiens are represented three times. The Islanders, Chicago Blackhawks and Bruins each have two teams ranked.

Video: Super 16 top five Stanley Cup Teams since 1967

To create this week's Super 16, each of the 13 participating staff members put together his or her version of what they think it should look like.

Those were submitted and a point total assigned to each. 

The championship team picked first was given 16 points, second got 15, third 14 and so on down to No. 16, which got one point. 

Here is the Super 16, best Stanley Cup championship teams from 1967 to present day:

 

1. 1976-77 Montreal Canadiens

Total points: 199

They scored 4.84 goals per game and allowed 2.14 per game. Their plus-216 goal differential is an NHL record. Hall of Fame forward Guy Lafleur led the League with 136 points (56 goals, 80 assists) in the regular season and 26 points (nine goals, 17 assists) in 14 playoff games. Hall of Fame goalie Ken Dryden was 41-6 with eight ties. He had 10 shutouts and a 2.14 goals-against average in the regular season and four shutouts while allowing 22 goals in the playoffs.

Video: 1977 Stanley Cup Final, Gm4: Canadiens vs Bruins

 

2. 1984-85 Edmonton Oilers

Total points: 127

The Oilers went 49-20 with 11 ties in the regular season and 15-3 in the playoffs, including sweeps in the first two rounds against the Los Angeles Kings and Winnipeg Jets, to win their second straight Stanley Cup championship. Wayne Gretzky led the League with 208 points (73 goals, 135 assists), his third-highest regular-season total in his legendary career. Forward Jari Kurri was second with 135 points (71 goals, 64 assists) and defenseman Paul Coffey was fifth with 121 points (37 goals, 84 assists). Gretzky scored 47 points (17 goals, 30 assists) in the playoffs. Coffey scored 37 points (12 goals, 25 assists) and Kurri scored 31 (19 goals, 12 assists). The Oilers led the League with 401 goals.

 

3. 1977-78 Montreal Canadiens

Total points: 109

The Canadiens won the Stanley Cup for the third straight season. They went 59-10 with 11 ties in the regular season for 129 points, third all-time. They were 12-3 in the playoffs, including a 4-2 series win against the Bruins in the Stanley Cup Final. Lafleur led the League in scoring for a third straight season with 132 points (60 goals, 72 assists). Jacques Lemaire was fourth with 97 points (36 goals, 61 assists). Lafleur (10 goals, 11 assists) and defenseman Larry Robinson (four goals, 17 assists) each scored 21 points in the playoffs. Forward Bob Gainey won the Selke Trophy (best defensive forward) in the first year it was awarded.

 

4. 2001-02 Detroit Red Wings

Total points: 99

The Red Wings had nine future Hall of Fame players. They won 51 games in the regular season and went 16-7 in the playoffs, defeating the Carolina Hurricanes in five games in the Stanley Cup Final. Dominik Hasek, a future Hall of Fame goalie, went 41-15 with eight ties, a 2.17 GAA and a .915 save percentage in the regular season. He was 16-7 with a 1.86 GAA and .920 save percentage and in the playoffs. It was Scotty Bowman's ninth and final Stanley Cup championship as a coach.

Video: 2002 Cup Final, Gm 5: Bowman's 9th Cup passes Blake

 

5. 1981-82 New York Islanders

Total points: 95

The Islanders won their third straight Stanley Cup championship after their best regular season. They set team records with 54 wins and 118 points. Hall of Fame forward Mike Bossy set an NHL career-high with 147 points (64 goals, 83 assists). Hall of Fame center Bryan Trottier scored an NHL career-high 50 goals. They won their last nine playoff games, defeating the New York Rangers in Game 6 of the Patrick Division Final before sweeping the Quebec Nordiques in the Wales Conference Final and the Vancouver Canucks in the Stanley Cup Final.

 

6. 1971-72 Boston Bruins

Total points: 84

The Bruins won the Stanley Cup for the second time in three seasons after going 54-13 with 11 ties for 119 points in the regular season. Hall of Fame center Phil Esposito (133 points) and Hall of Fame defenseman Bobby Orr (117 points) were first and second, respectively, in scoring. Each had 24 points in the playoffs. The Bruins went 12-3 in the playoffs, including defeating the Rangers 4-2 in the Stanley Cup Final. Orr became the only player in NHL history to win the Hart Trophy, Norris Trophy and Conn Smythe Trophy in the same season.

 

7. 1975-76 Montreal Canadiens

Total points: 80

The Canadiens won the Stanley Cup for the first of four straight seasons, going 12-1 in the playoffs, including a sweep of the Philadelphia Flyers in the Cup Final. They went 58-11 with 11 ties for 127 points in the regular season. The 58 wins and 127 points are each fifth all-time in NHL history. Lafleur led the League in scoring for the first time with 125 points (56 goals, 69 assists). 

 

8. 1991-92 Pittsburgh Penguins

Total points: 72

The regular season wasn't great for the Penguins, who went 39-32 with nine ties for 87 points, finishing third in the Patrick Division. They needed seven games to get by the Washington Capitals in the Patrick Division Semifinals and trailed the Rangers 2-1 in the division finals. But then they reeled off an 11-game winning streak to win their second straight Stanley Cup, sweeping the Bruins in the Wales Conference Final and the Blackhawks in the Cup Final. Hall of Fame center Mario Lemieux led the League with 131 points (44 goals, 87 assists). Forward Kevin Stevens was second with 123 points (54 goals, 69 assists). Lemieux (34 points) and Stevens (28 points) were also first and second in the playoffs.

 

9. 1983-84 Edmonton Oilers

Total points: 71

The Oilers won 57 games in the regular season and went 15-4 in the playoffs, sweeping the Winnipeg Jets in the first round and the Minnesota North Stars in the conference final. They defeated the Islanders 4-1 in the Stanley Cup Final, ending New York's run of four straight Stanley Cup championships and NHL-record 19 straight playoff series wins. The Oilers set the NHL record for most goals in a regular season with 446, an average of 5.58 per game. Gretzky led the League with 205 points (87 goals, 118 assists). Coffey had 126 points (40 goals, 86 assists), Kurri had 113 points (52 goals, 61 assists) and Mark Messier had 101 points (37 goals, 64 assists). Hall of Fame forward Glenn Anderson had 99 points (54 goals, 45 assists).

Video: 1984 Cup Final, Gm5: Oilers take the Cup from Isles

 

10. 1982-83 New York Islanders

Total points: 68

The Islanders rallied late in the regular season, winning 10 of their final 14 games to finish 42-26 with 12 ties, second in the Patrick Division with 96 points. The three-time defending Stanley Cup champions then rolled through the playoffs, winning 15 of 20 games, including a sweep of the Oilers in the Cup Final. Bossy scored 60 goals in the regular season and 17 in the playoffs.

 

11. 1969-70 Boston Bruins

Total points: 67

The Bruins won their first of two Stanley Cup championships in the Orr era after finishing the regular season with 99 points (40-17 with 19 ties). They needed 14 games to win 12 in the playoffs, including sweeps of the Blackhawks and St. Louis Blues in the final two rounds. Orr set what was then an NHL record for most points in a season by a defenseman with 120 (33 goals, 87 assists). Esposito had 99 points (43 goals, 56 assists). In the playoffs, Esposito had 27 points (13 goals, 14 assists) and Orr had 20 (nine goals, 11 assists). Orr scored the famous Cup-clinching overtime goal in Game 4 against the Blues, when he soared through the air after the puck went in the net.

 

12. 1987-88 Edmonton Oilers

Total points: 59

The Oilers, who were 44-25 with 11 ties in the regular season, won the Stanley Cup for the second straight season and fourth time in five seasons by going 16-2 in the playoffs, with sweeps of the Presidents' Trophy-winning Flames in the Smythe Division Final and the Bruins in the Stanley Cup Final. Gretzky missed 16 games in the regular season because of injury and still finished with 149 points (40 goals, 109 assists) in 64 games. Messier had 111 points (37 goals, 74 assists). Gretzky, who had 43 points in the playoffs, set NHL records with 31 postseason assists and 13 points in the Cup Final. Messier had 34 points in the playoffs (11 goals, 23 assists).

 

13. 2012-13 Chicago Blackhawks

Total points: 53

The Blackhawks won the Stanley Cup for the second time in four seasons after a dominant regular season that was cut to 48 games because of the work stoppage. Chicago went 36-7-5 in the regular season, including 21-0-3 in their first 24 games, setting the NHL record for consecutive games with a point to start a season. They went 16-7 in the playoffs, winning the Stanley Cup by defeating the Bruins 3-2 in Game 6 at TD Garden. Chicago scored the game-tying and game-winning goals in a span of 17 seconds in the final 1:16 of the third period.

Video: 2013 Cup Final, Gm6: Late goals propel Hawks to Cup

 

14. 1986-87 Edmonton Oilers

Total points: 52

The Oilers won the Stanley Cup for the third time in four seasons after going 50-24 with six ties in the regular season. They rolled through the first three rounds, losing only two games, but the Flyers presented an issue in the Cup Final. The Oilers had a 3-1 lead in the best-of-7 series, but lost Game 5 at home and Game 6 at Philadelphia. They returned to Northlands Coliseum for Game 7 and won 3-1. Gretzky had 183 points (62 goals, 121 assists) in the regular season. 

 

15. 1988-89 Calgary Flames

Total points: 47

The Flames won their first and only Stanley Cup championship after winning the Presidents' Trophy for the second straight season. They went 54-17 with nine ties for 117 points in the regular season. They defeated the Vancouver Canucks in a seven-game series in the Smythe Division Semifinals, winning Game 7 in overtime. They rallied from there by winning 12 of their next 15 games. Calgary trailed 2-1 in the Stanley Cup Final against the Canadiens but rallied with three straight victories to win the series.

 

16. 2009-10 Chicago Blackhawks

Total points: 34

The Blackhawks ended the longest active Stanley Cup drought (49 years) by winning the championship for the first time since 1961. They went 52-22-8 for 112 points in the regular season and 16-6 in the playoffs. Every series ended in six games or fewer, including a sweep of the San Jose Sharks in the Western Conference Final. Right wing Patrick Kane, who led Chicago with 88 points (30 goals, 58 assists) in the regular season, scored the Cup-clinching overtime goal in Game 6 against the Flyers at Wells Fargo Center. Jonathan Toews had 29 points (seven goals, 22 assists) in the playoffs to win the Conn Smythe Trophy.

 

Others receiving points: 1980-81 New York Islanders, 33; 1993-94 New York Rangers, 33; 1973-74 Philadelphia Flyers, 30; 2000-01 Colorado Avalanche, 29; 1974-75 Philadelphia Flyers, 28; 1995-96 Colorado Avalanche, 24; 1996-97 Detroit Red Wings, 24; 1997-98 Detroit Red Wings, 24; 2011-12 Los Angeles Kings, 24; 1972-73 Montreal Canadiens, 23; 1990-91 Pittsburgh Penguins, 22; 1994-95 New Jersey Devils, 21; 1967-68 Montreal Canadiens, 18; 2016-17 Pittsburgh Penguins, 17; 1968-69 Montreal Canadiens, 13; 1979-80 New York Islanders, 11; 1992-93 Montreal Canadiens, 11; 2010-11 Boston Bruins, 10; 1978-79 Montreal Canadiens, 7; 2008-09 Pittsburgh Penguins, 7; 2018-19 St. Louis Blues, 7; 1999-2000 New Jersey Devils, 6; 2006-07 Anaheim Ducks, 6; 2007-08 Detroit Red Wings, 6; 2017-18 Washington Capitals, 6; 2014-15 Chicago Blackhawks, 5; 2002-03 New Jersey Devils, 4; 2013-14 Los Angeles Kings, 3

 

HERE'S HOW WE RANKED 'EM 

AMALIE BENJAMIN 

1. 2001-02 Red Wings; 2. 1984-85 Oilers; 3. 1991-92 Penguins; 4. 1976-77 Canadiens; 5. 2000-01 Avalanche; 6. 1993-94 Rangers; 7. 1997-98 Red Wings; 8. 1987-88 Oilers; 9. 1982-83 Islanders; 10. 2012-13 Blackhawks; 11. 2010-11 Bruins; 12. 1977-78 Canadiens; 13. 1983-84 Oilers; 14. 2013-14 Kings; 15. 2008-09 Penguins; 16. 1999-2000 Devils

BRIAN COMPTON 

1. 1976-77 Canadiens; 2. 1981-82 Islanders; 3. 1984-85 Oilers; 4. 1968-69 Canadiens; 5. 1969-70 Bruins; 6. 1974-75 Flyers; 7. 1990-91 Penguins; 8. 1988-89 Flames; 9. 1994-95 Devils; 10. 2001-02 Red Wings; 11. 1995-96 Avalanche; 12. 1993-94 Rangers; 13. 2010-11 Bruins; 14. 2016-17 Penguins; 15. 2017-18 Capitals; 16. 2009-10 Blackhawks

NICHOLAS J. COTSONIKA

1. 1976-77 Canadiens; 2. 1977-78 Canadiens; 3. 1975-76 Canadiens; 4. 1971-72 Bruins; 5. 1983-84 Oilers; 6. 1981-82 Islanders; 7. 1980-81 Islanders; 8. 1984-85 Oilers; 9. 2012-13 Blackhawks; 10. 2001-02 Red Wings; 11. 1991-92 Penguins; 12. 1988-89 Flames; 13. 1978-79 Canadiens; 14. 2000-01 Avalanche; 15. 1973-74 Flyers; 16. 1974-75 Flyers

WILLIAM DOUGLAS 

1. 1976-77 Canadiens; 2. 1977-78 Canadiens; 3. 1984-85 Oilers; 4. 1980-81 Islanders; 5. 1969-70 Bruins; 6. 1973-74 Flyers; 7. 1991-92 Penguins; 8. 2009-10 Blackhawks; 9. 1982-83 Islanders; 10. 1971-72 Bruins; 11. 1986-87 Oilers; 12. 1996-97 Red Wings; 13. 1988-89 Flames; 14. 1993-94 Rangers; 15. 2011-12 Kings; 16. 2017-18 Capitals

TOM GULITTI 

1. 1976-77 Canadiens; 2. 1987-88 Oilers; 3. 1981-82 Islanders; 4. 1991-92 Penguins; 5. 1971-72 Bruins; 6. 1984-85 Oilers; 7. 1982-83 Islanders; 8. 2001-02 Red Wings; 9. 2012-13 Blackhawks; 10. 1977-78 Canadiens; 11. 1969-70 Bruins; 12. 1999-2000 Devils; 13. 1993-94 Rangers; 14. 2016-17 Penguins; 15. 1997-98 Red Wings; 16. 1988-89 Flames.

ADAM KIMELMAN

1. 1984-85 Oilers; 2. 1976-77 Canadiens; 3. 1982-83 Islanders; 4. 1986-87 Oilers; 5. 1990-91 Penguins; 6. 1979-80 Islanders; 7. 1969-70 Bruins; 8. 1975-76 Canadiens; 9. 1967-68 Canadiens; 10. 2001-02 Red Wings; 11. 1996-97 Red Wings; 12. 2012-13 Blackhawks; 13. 1974-75 Flyers; 14. 2016-17 Penguins; 15. 2011-12 Kings; 16. 1987-88 Oilers 

ROBERT LAFLAMME 

1. 1976-77 Canadiens; 2. 1982-83 Islanders; 3. 1983-84 Oilers; 4. 2001-02 Red Wings; 5. 1977-78 Canadiens; 6. 1971-72 Bruins; 7. 2009-10 Blackhawks; 8. 1981-82 Islanders; 9. 2000-01 Avalanche; 10. 1997-98 Red Wings; 11. 1988-89 Flames; 12. 1986-87 Oilers; 13. 1991-92 Penguins; 14. 2002-03 Devils; 15. 1993-94 Rangers; 16. 1992-93 Canadiens

MIKE G. MORREALE

1. 1976-77 Canadiens; 2. 1987-88 Oilers; 3. 1973-74 Flyers; 4. 1994-95 Devils; 5. 1996-97 Red Wings; 6. 1986-87 Oilers; 7. 1991-92 Penguins; 8. 1969-70 Bruins; 9. 1980-81 Islanders; 10. 1992-93 Canadiens; 11. 1971-72 Bruins; 12. 2014-15 Blackhawks; 13. 2001-02 Red Wings; 14. 1982-83 Islanders; 15. 2011-12 Kings; 16. 1988-89 Flames

TRACEY MYERS 

1. 1984-85 Oilers; 2. 1995-96 Avalanche; 3. 2009-10 Blackhawks; 4. 2011-12 Kings; 5. 2001-02 Red Wings; 6. 1976-77 Canadiens; 7. 1982-83 Islanders; 8. 1969-70 Bruins; 9. 2016-17 Penguins; 10. 2018-19 Blues; 11. 2006-07 Ducks; 12. 2012-13 Blackhawks; 13. 1993-94 Rangers; 14. 2017-18 Capitals; 15. 1974-75 Flyers; 16. 2002-03 Devils

BILL PRICE

1. 1976-77 Canadiens; 2. 1977-78 Canadiens; 3. 1975-76 Canadiens; 4. 1984-85 Oilers; 5. 1981-82 Islanders; 6. 1986-87 Oilers; 7. 1967-68 Canadiens; 8. 1988-89 Flames; 9. 1971-72 Bruins; 10. 2001-02 Red Wings; 11. 1991-92 Penguins; 12. 2011-12 Kings; 13. 1993-94 Rangers; 14. 1992-93 Canadiens; 15. 1995-96 Avalanche; 16. 1973-74 Flyers  

SHAWN P. ROARKE 

1. 1976-77 Canadiens; 2. 1975-76 Canadiens; 3. 1983-84 Oilers; 4. 1971-72 Bruins; 5. 1981-82 Islanders; 6. 1977-78 Canadiens; 7. 1987-88 Oilers; 8. 2012-13 Blackhawks; 9. 1988-89 Flames; 10. 1974-75 Flyers; 11. 2007-08 Red Wings; 12. 2008-09 Penguins; 13. 1972-73 Canadiens; 14. 2001-02 Red Wings; 15. 1984-85 Oilers; 16. 1995-96 Avalanche

DAN ROSEN 

1. 1976-77 Canadiens; 2. 1975-76 Canadiens; 3. 1977-78 Canadiens; 4. 1983-84 Oilers; 5. 1981-82 Islanders; 6. 2012-13 Blackhawks; 7. 1971-72 Bruins; 8. 1987-88 Oilers; 9. 1972-73 Canadiens; 10. 2001-02 Red Wings; 11. 2000-01 Avalanche; 12. 1984-85 Oilers; 13. 1988-89 Flames; 14. 1978-79 Canadiens; 15. 1973-74 Flyers; 16. 1991-92 Penguins

MIKE ZEISBERGER 

1. 1976-77 Canadiens; 2. 1977-78 Canadiens; 3. 1983-84 Oilers; 4. 1975-76 Canadiens; 5. 1984-85 Oilers; 6. 1972-73 Canadiens; 7. 1981-82 Islanders; 8. 1969-70 Bruins; 9. 1991-92 Penguins; 10. 2001-02 Red Wings; 11. 1986-87 Oilers; 12. 1997-98 Red Wings; 13. 1971-72 Bruins; 14. 1974-75 Flyers; 15. 1980-81 Islanders; 16. 1996-97 Red Wings

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