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Greatest NHL Teams

Stanley Cup Champions 2000-2009

Devils and Red Wings win two Cups each; Ducks win California's first Cup

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The New Jersey Devils and Detroit Red Wings each won two Stanley Cups in the first decade of the new millennium, while Ray Bourque ended his legendary career in 2001 by helping the Colorado Avalanche win the franchise's second championship. The Tampa Bay Lightning, Carolina Hurricanes and Anaheim Ducks each won their first titles in three consecutive seasons from 2004 to 2007, as the 2004-05 campaign was lost due to a work stoppage. The Pittsburgh Penguins closed out the decade with their first Cup since 1992, avenging a loss to Detroit in the Final one year earlier.

 

2000 New Jersey Devils

On the strength of Jason Arnott's winning goal in double overtime in Game 6, the New Jersey Devils won their second Stanley Cup by defeating the Dallas Stars in a roller-coaster Final series. With the Devils rebounding from a triple overtime loss in Game 5, the series was just the second in Stanley Cup Final history and the first since 1931 to feature consecutive, multiple overtime games.

Following a similar script from the their first Stanley Cup run five years earlier, the Devils were a dominant road club, posting a 10-2 record away from home. That tied the NHL postseason record that New Jersey set in 1995 (10-1). The Devils won all three games at Dallas, tying the Stanley Cup Final record for most road wins. Larry Robinson, who made his debut as Devils head coach in March, became just the third coach in NHL history to win the Stanley Cup following an in-season coaching change.

KEY COMPONENTS

Captain: Scott Stevens
Conn Smythe Trophy Winner: Scott Stevens
Stanley Cup-Winning Goal: Jason Arnott (28:20, OT, Game 6)
Head Coach: Larry Robinson
General Manager: Lou Lamoriello

NOTABLE PLAYERS

Jason Arnott   C
Patrik Elias   C
Petr Sykora   RW
Scott Stevens   D
Martin Brodeur   G

ROAD TO THE CUP

Conference Quarterfinals: Florida Panthers (4-0)
Conference Semifinals: Toronto Maple Leafs (4-2)
Conference Finals: Philadelphia Flyers (4-3)
Stanley Cup Final: Dallas Stars (4-2)

 

2001 Colorado Avalanche

The Colorado Avalanche won their second Stanley Cup in six seasons. Unlike their first championship in 1996, when the Avalanche never needed more than six games to win a series and swept the Stanley Cup Final, Colorado was pushed to the brink twice in 2001 -- including a stirring win in the Stanley Cup Final against the defending Cup champion New Jersey Devils.

Goaltender Patrick Roy became the first player to win the Conn Smythe Trophy three times, having previously captured the award in 1986 and 1993 with the Montreal Canadiens. Roy posted a 16-7 playoff record with a 1.70 goals-against average, .934 save percentage and four shutouts. Captain Joe Sakic led all playoff scorers with 13-13--26 and was central to one of the enduring moments in Stanley Cup history -- passing the trophy to first-time winner Ray Bourque in the final game of the defenseman's brilliant 22-year NHL career.

KEY COMPONENTS

Captain: Joe Sakic
Conn Smythe Trophy Winner: Patrick Roy
Stanley Cup-Winning Goal: Alex Tanguay (4:57, 2nd Period, Game 7)
Head Coach: Bob Hartley
General Manager: Pierre Lacroix 

NOTABLE PLAYERS

Chris Drury   C
Joe Sakic   C
Alex Tanguay LW
Rob Blake   D
Patrick Roy   G

ROAD TO THE CUP

Conference Quarterfinals: Vancouver Canucks (4-0)
Conference Semifinals: Los Angeles Kings (4-3)
Conference Finals: St. Louis Blues (4-1)
Stanley Cup Final: New Jersey Devils (4-3)

 

2002 Detroit Red Wings

Boasting a lineup laden with future Hockey Hall of Famers, the Detroit Red Wings took an unconventional route to Stanley Cup glory, becoming the first team in NHL history to win the championship after starting the playoffs with two losses at home.

After losing the first two games to Vancouver, the Red Wings won 16 of their next 21 games en route to their third Cup win under head coach Scotty Bowman. Bowman established a new coaching record with his ninth Cup victory, surpassing the mark he held with legendary Montreal coach Toe Blake. The Cup win was the first for many veterans on the team, including goaltender Dominik Hasek, forward Luc Robitaille and defensemen Steve Duchesne and Fredrik Olausson. It also marked the second Cup win for 40-year-old defenseman Chris Chelios, 16 years after he first won the Cup as a member of the Montreal Canadiens in 1986, and 37-year-old right wing Brett Hull, who won the Cup with the Dallas Stars in 1999.

KEY COMPONENTS

Captain: Steve Yzerman
Conn Smythe Trophy Winner: Nicklas Lidstrom
Stanley Cup-Winning Goal: Brendan Shanahan (14:04, 2nd Period, Game 5)
Head Coach: Scotty Bowman
General Manager: Ken Holland

NOTABLE PLAYERS

Sergei Fedorov   C
Brendan Shanahan   LW
Steve Yzerman C
Nicklas Lidstrom   D
Dominik Hasek   G

ROAD TO THE CUP

Conference Quarterfinals: Vancouver Canucks (4-2)
Conference Semifinals: St. Louis Blues (4-1)
Conference Finals: Colorado Avalanche (4-3)
Stanley Cup Final: Carolina Hurricanes (4-1)

 

2003 New Jersey Devils

The New Jersey Devils won their third Stanley Cup in nine seasons after defeating Anaheim in Game 7 of the Cup Final. The series marked the first time since 1965 that the home team won every game in the final.

The Devils set an NHL playoff record with 12 home victories overall in the postseason (12-1). Brodeur blanked Anaheim in the series-clinching game, recording just the third shutout ever in Game 7 of a Stanley Cup Final. It also was his NHL record-tying third shutout in a single Stanley Cup Final and record-setting seventh shutout in a single postseason. Brodeur joined four other players -- Sergei Brylin, Ken Daneyko, Scott Niedermayer and Scott Stevens -- as members of the Devils' three Stanley Cup-winning teams (1995, 2000 and 2003).

KEY COMPONENTS

Captain: Scott Stevens
Conn Smythe Trophy Winner: n/a
Stanley Cup-Winning Goal: Mike Rupp (2:22, 2nd Period, Game 7)
Head Coach: Pat Burns
General Manager: Lou Lamoriello

NOTABLE PLAYERS

Patrik Elias   C
Brian Gionta    RW
Scott Gomez   C
Scott Niedermayer   D
Martin Brodeur   G

ROAD TO THE CUP

Conference Quarterfinals: Boston Bruins (4-1)
Conference Semifinals: Tampa Bay Lightning (4-1)
Conference Finals: Ottawa Senators (4-3)
Stanley Cup Final: Mighty Ducks of Anaheim (4-3)

 

2004 Tampa Bay Lightning

Led by Conn Smythe Trophy winner Brad Richards' NHL-record seven game-winning goals in the postseason, the Tampa Bay Lightning became the sixth NHL club in the expansion era to win the Stanley Cup in their first Final appearance.

The Lightning joined the Philadelphia Flyers (1974), New York Islanders (1980), Pittsburgh Penguins (1991), New Jersey Devils (1995) and Colorado Avalanche (1996). In addition to his record game-winning goals total, Richards led all playoff scorers with 12-14--26. The Lightning finished the season 31-0-2 (regular season and playoffs) when Richards scored a goal. Lightning captain Dave Andreychuk captured his first career Stanley Cup after 22 seasons and 1,759 games (regular-season and playoff). Lightning goaltender Nikolai Khabibulin posted a 16-7 record, a 1.71 goals-against average, a .933 save percentage and five shutouts in the playoffs, including a 7-0 mark, 0.95 goals-against average, .963 save percentage and two shutouts following a loss.

KEY COMPONENTS

Captain: Dave Andreychuk
Conn Smythe Trophy Winner: Brad Richards
Stanley Cup-Winning Goal: Ruslan Fedotenko (14:38, 2nd Period, Game 7)
Head Coach: John Tortorella
General Manager: Jay Feaster 

NOTABLE PLAYERS

Vincent Lecavalier   C
Brad Richards   C
Martin St. Louis  RW
Dan Boyle   D
Nikolai Khabibulin   G

ROAD TO THE CUP

Conference Quarterfinals: New York Islanders (4-1)
Conference Semifinals: Montreal Canadiens (4-0)
Conference Finals: Philadelphia Flyers (4-3)
Stanley Cup Final: Calgary Flames (4-3)

 

2006 Carolina Hurricanes

The Carolina Hurricanes, competing in their 27th season since joining the NHL in 1979-80 as the Hartford Whalers, captured the first Stanley Cup in franchise history. Eric Staal, 21, became the second-youngest playoff scoring leader in the NHL's modern era.

Conn Smythe Trophy winner Cam Ward turned in one of the finest rookie goaltending performances in League playoff history, finishing the 2006 playoffs with a 15-8 record, 2.14 goals-against average, .920 save percentage and two shutouts. Ward became just the fourth rookie to capture the Conn Smythe, joining fellow goaltenders Ken Dryden, Patrick Roy and Ron Hextall. Ward, 22, also was the second-youngest to capture the award behind Roy, who won the first of his three Conn Smythes at 20. Eric Staal led all playoff scorers with 28 points (nine goals, 19 assists) in 25 games. At 21 years, eight months, Staal became the second-youngest playoff scoring leader in the League's modern era, behind Detroit's Gordie Howe in 1949 (21 years, 16 days).

KEY COMPONENTS

Captain: Rod Brind'Amour
Conn Smythe Trophy Winner: Cam Ward
Stanley Cup-Winning Goal: Frantisek Kaberle (4:18, 2nd Period, Game 7)
Head Coach: Peter Laviolette
General Manager: Jim Rutherford

NOTABLE PLAYERS

Rod Brind'Amour   C
Eric Staal   C
Cory Stillman   LW
Frantisek Kaberle   D
Cam Ward   G

ROAD TO THE CUP

Conference Quarterfinals: Montreal Canadiens (4-2)
Conference Semifinals: New Jersey Devils (4-1)
Conference Finals: Buffalo Sabres (4-3)
Stanley Cup Final: Edmonton Oilers (4-3)

 

2007 Anaheim Ducks

The Anaheim Ducks captured their first Stanley Cup, becoming the first California-based champion and the first west coast winner since 1925. The previous Cup-winning club from the west coast was the Victoria Cougars of the defunct Western Canada Hockey League.

Teemu Selanne, 36, captured his first career Stanley Cup in his 1,127th NHL game (regular-season and playoffs) over 14 seasons. The win capped off a memorable 2006-07 campaign for the Finnish Flash that featured his 500th career goal and his 1,000th game. Other veterans winning their first title included Chris Pronger (995 GP), Brad May (964), Todd Marchant (961), Rob Niedermayer (943) and Sean O'Donnell (931). Four years after becoming the first set of brothers on opposing clubs in the Stanley Cup Final since 1946, Rob and Scott Niedermayer became the first brothers to win the Stanley Cup as teammates since Brent and Duane Sutter with the New York Islanders in 1983.

KEY COMPONENTS

Captain: Scott Niedermayer
Conn Smythe Trophy Winner: Scott Niedermayer
Stanley Cup-Winning Goal: Travis Moen (15:44, 2nd Period, Game 5)
Head Coach: Randy Carlyle
General Manager: Brian Burke

NOTABLE PLAYERS

Ryan Getzlaf    C
Corey Perry RW
Scott Niedermayer   D
Chris Pronger   D
J.S. Giguere   G

ROAD TO THE CUP

Conference Quarterfinals: Minnesota Wild (4-1)
Conference Semifinals: Vancouver Canucks (4-1)
Conference Finals: Detroit Red Wings (4-2)
Stanley Cup Final: Ottawa Senators (4-1)

 

2008 Detroit Red Wings

After starting the season by setting an NHL record for most first-half regular-season wins (30-8-3), the Detroit Red Wings ended it with their 11th Stanley Cup. Sweden native Nicklas Lidstrom made history by becoming the first European-trained captain to hoist the Stanley Cup.

The Red Wings also reached the 100-point mark for the eighth consecutive season, matching the Montreal Canadiens' record streak from 1974-75 through 1981-82; captured their seventh consecutive division title; earned a berth in the Stanley Cup playoffs for the 17th consecutive season; won their sixth Presidents' Trophy as the League's top regular-season club and set a franchise playoff record by winning nine consecutive games from Apr. 18 to May 12. Sweden native Nicklas Lidstrom made history by becoming the first European-trained captain to hoist the Stanley Cup. Five members of the Red Wings won the Stanley Cup for the fourth time with the club since 1997: Lidstrom, Kris Draper, Tomas Holmstrom, Kirk Maltby and Darren McCarty.

KEY COMPONENTS

Captain: Nicklas Lidstrom
Conn Smythe Trophy Winner: Henrik Zetterberg
Stanley Cup-Winning Goal: Henrik Zetterberg (7:36, 3rd Period, Game 6)
Head Coach: Mike Babcock
General Manager: Ken Holland

NOTABLE PLAYERS

Pavel Datsyuk   C
Johan Franzen   RW
Henrik Zetterberg   C
Nicklas Lidstrom   D
Chris Osgood   G

ROAD TO THE CUP

Conference Quarterfinals: Nashville Predators (4-2)
Conference Semifinals: Colorado Avalanche (4-0)
Conference Finals: Dallas Stars (4-2)
Stanley Cup Final: Pittsburgh Penguins (4-2)

 

2009 Pittsburgh Penguins

Led by Conn Smythe Trophy winner Evgeni Malkin and captain Sidney Crosby, the Pittsburgh Penguins captured their third Stanley Cup since joining the NHL in 1967-68 and first championship since 1992, dethroning the defending champion Detroit Red Wings in a thrilling seven-game Stanley Cup Final and rematch of the previous year's title series.

The Penguins joined the 1945 Maple Leafs and 1971 Canadiens as the only clubs to win Game 7 of the Stanley Cup Final on the road. Crosby, 21, became the youngest captain in NHL history to hoist the Cup while Malkin, 22, became the third-youngest player to be voted postseason MVP. Malkin's League-leading 34 playoff points were the most in one year since Wayne Gretzky's 40 in 1992-93. Dan Bylsma became just the fourth rookie head coach in 50 years to capture the Stanley Cup. Bylsma made his NHL coaching debut midseason and went 18-3-4 heading into the playoffs.

KEY COMPONENTS

Captain: Sidney Crosby
Conn Smythe Trophy Winner: Evgeni Malkin
Stanley Cup-Winning Goal: Max Talbot (10:07, 2nd Period, Game 7)
Head Coach: Dan Bylsma
General Manager: Ray Shero

NOTABLE PLAYERS

Sidney Crosby C
Evgeni Malkin C
Max Talbot C
Kris Letang    D
Marc-Andre Fleury G

ROAD TO THE CUP

Conference Quarterfinals: Philadelphia Flyers (4-2)
Conference Semifinals: Washington Capitals (4-3)
Conference Finals: Carolina Hurricanes (4-0)
Stanley Cup Final: Detroit Red Wings (4-3)

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