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Greatest NHL Teams

Stanley Cup Champions 1960-1969

Dominant Canadiens, Leafs own the decade; Black Hawks get a title

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Canadian clubs continued to dominate in the 1960s. The Montreal Canadiens opened the decade with their fifth consecutive Stanley Cup title and added four more, in 1965, 1966, 1968 and 1969. The Toronto Maple Leafs won four championships during the decade, including their most recent Cup win in 1967, to give the two Canadian Original Six franchises a total of 13 titles in 14 seasons. The lone exception was the 1961 Chicago Black Hawks, who won their only Stanley Cup of the Bobby Hull/Stan Mikita era. Chicago's next drink from the Cup wouldn't come for 49 years.

 

1960 Montreal Canadiens

The Montreal Canadiens won the Stanley Cup for an unprecedented fifth consecutive season. The Canadiens made history in style, finishing 13 points clear of their nearest competitor during the regular season and going 8-0 in the playoffs while outscoring the opposition 29-11. Twelve players formed the core of the greatest NHL dynasty ever, playing a part in all five triumphs - Jacques Plante, Maurice Richard, Henri Richard, Dickie Moore, Jean Béliveau, Doug Harvey, Bernie Geoffrion, Tom Johnson, Claude Provost, Jean-Guy Talbot, Don Marshall and Bob Turner. Plante, who had introduced the goalie mask to the hockey world earlier in the season, sparkled with his self-designed face guard. His Stanley Cup Final performance, which included just five goals allowed in four games against Toronto, played a large role in the acceptance of the mask by goaltenders worldwide. Maurice Richard closed his distinguished career with eight Stanley Cups and the record for career goals in the Final (34).

Video: 1960 Cup Final, Gm4: Habs win record 5th straight Cup

KEY COMPONENTS

Captain: Maurice Richard
Stanley Cup-Winning Goal: Jean Beliveau (8:16, 1st Period, Game 4)
Head Coach: Toe Blake
General Manager: Frank Selke

NOTABLE PLAYERS

Bernie Geoffrion RW
Dickie Moore LW
Henri Richard C
Doug Harvey D
Jacques Plante G

ROAD TO THE CUP

Semifinals: Chicago Blackhawks (4-0)
Stanley Cup Final: Toronto Maple Leafs (4-0)

 

1961 Chicago Black Hawks

The Chicago Black Hawks captured their first Stanley Cup since 1938 and third championship since joining the NHL in 1926-27. The win capped a successful rebuild for a franchise that had finished last in nine of 11 seasons from 1946-47 through 1956-57. In the Semifinals, the Black Hawks defeated the Montreal Canadiens, who had captured an unprecedented five consecutive Stanley Cups and were favored to win a sixth after leading the NHL during the regular season with 92 points, 17 more than Chicago. Two of the greatest athletes in Chicago sports history - Bobby Hull and Stan Mikita - made their premier Stanley Cup Final appearances, and each figured in the win over Detroit. Hull tallied two goals, including the game-winner, in the series opener, while Mikita scored the winner in Game 5. Goaltender Glenn Hall, acquired from the Red Wings four seasons before, won the first and only Stanley Cup of his Hall of Fame career.

Video: 1961 Cup Final, Gm 6: Hawks win first Cup in 23 years

KEY COMPONENTS

Captain: Ed Litzenberger
Stanley Cup-Winning Goal: Ab McDonald (18:49, 2nd Period, Game 6)
Head Coach: Rudy Pilous
General Manager: Tommy Ivan

NOTABLE PLAYERS

Murray Balfour RW
Bobby Hull LW
Stan Mikita C
Pierre Pilote D
Glenn Hall G

ROAD TO THE CUP

Semifinals: Montreal Canadiens (4-2)
Stanley Cup Final: Detroit Red Wings (4-2)

 

1962 Toronto Maple Leafs

The Maple Leafs regained the Stanley Cup after 11 years, putting an end to the club's longest period without a championship since joining the NHL 45 years earlier. Defenseman Tim Horton led the Maple Leafs and finished second in NHL playoff scoring with 16 points (3 goals, 13 assists), including an assist on Dick Duff's Stanley Cup winning goal against the defending champion Chicago Black Hawks. George Armstrong and Bob Pulford tied for second in the NHL with seven playoff goals each, while Frank Mahovlich had four goals and seven points in the Stanley Cup Final. In early June of 1962, just over six weeks after the Final, the crash site and body of Bill Barilko was discovered in northern Ontario. Barilko, the overtime hero the last time the Maple Leafs had won the Stanley Cup in 1951, had been missing since the summer of that year.

KEY COMPONENTS

Captain: George Armstrong
Stanley Cup-Winnning Goal: Dick Duff (14:14, 3rd Period, Game 6)
Head Coach: Punch Imlach
General Manager: Punch Imlach

NOTABLE PLAYERS

George Armstrong RW
Dave Keon C
Frank Mahovlich LW
Tim Horton D
Johnny Bower G

ROAD TO THE CUP

Semifinals: New York Rangers (4-2)
Stanley Cup Final: Chicago Black Hawks (4-2)

 

1963 Toronto Maple Leafs

The Toronto Maple Leafs won the second of three consecutive Stanley Cups. Five different Maple Leafs - Bob Nevin, Dick Duff, Ron Stewart, Red Kelly and Dave Keon - recorded multiple-goal performances in the five-game Stanley Cup Final win over Detroit. In Game 1, Duff set a playoff record that still stands by scoring the fastest two goals from the start of a game (1:08). Keon scored twice in Game 5 with Toronto players in the penalty box, establishing a playoff mark for shorthanded goals in one game. He also led the Maple Leafs and finished third in NHL playoff scoring with 5-7-12. Thirty-eight year-old goaltender Johnny Bower led the playoffs in GAA (1.60) and limited Detroit to 10 goals in five Final games. Of Toronto's three consecutive champions from 1962-64, the 1963 team posted the best playoff record (8-2) and was the only one to win the regular-season title (35-23-12).

KEY COMPONENTS

Captain: George Armstrong
Stanley Cup-Winnning Goal: Eddie Shack (13:28, 3rd Period, Game 5)
Head Coach: Punch Imlach
General Manager: Punch Imlach

NOTABLE PLAYERS

George Armstrong RW
Red Kelly C
Dave Keon C
Tim Horton D
Johnny Bower G

ROAD TO THE CUP

Semifinals: Montreal Canadiens (4-1)
Stanley Cup Final: Detroit Red Wings (4-1)

 

1964 Toronto Maple Leafs

Tying their club record set from 1947 to 1949, Toronto captured the Stanley Cup for a third consecutive season. The Maple Leafs advanced through the Semifinals by defeating the Montreal Canadiens. In the Final, the Leafs lost Games 2, 3 and 5 by one-goal margins to trail the Detroit Red Wings 3-2 in the series. With the score tied 3-3 late in Game 6 and with his team's season on the line, Toronto defenseman Bob Baun took a Gordie Howe slap shot off the right ankle and was carried off the ice on a stretcher, but returned in overtime and scored the game-winning goal. Baun also played in Game 7 despite the pain, and it was revealed after the series that he had a broken ankle. Forward Frank Mahovlich led the Maple Leafs and finished third overall in NHL playoff scoring with 15 points (four goals, 11 assists).

Video: 1964 Cup Final, Gm6: Baun breaks leg, scores in OT

KEY COMPONENTS

Captain: George Armstrong
Stanley Cup-Winnning Goal: Andy Bathgate (3:04, 1st Period, Game 7)
Head Coach: Punch Imlach
General Manager: Punch Imlach

NOTABLE PLAYERS

George Armstrong RW
Dave Keon C
Frank Mahovlich LW
Bob Baun D
Johnny Bower G

ROAD TO THE CUP

Semifinals: Montreal Canadiens (4-3)
Stanley Cup Final: Detroit Red Wings (4-3)

 

1965 Montreal Canadiens

The Montreal Canadiens won the 13th Stanley Cup in franchise history, derailing their rival Toronto Maple Leafs' bid for a fourth consecutive title in a six-game Semifinal series. Capped by his 10-point performance in the Final against Chicago, Canadiens center Jean Beliveau was voted the inaugural winner of the Conn Smythe Trophy, awarded to the NHL's playoff MVP. Repeating the feat accomplished in 1955, the home team won every game in the Final. With the extra game at the Montreal Forum, the Canadiens treated their fans to four victories. Goaltender Gump Worsley, appearing in his first Stanley Cup Final after 12 seasons in the NHL, recorded two shutouts in four starts, including one in Game 7. Better known as a defensive specialist, right wing Claude Provost led the club in scoring during the regular season with 64 points, including 27 goals, marking the best offensive season of his career.

Video: 1965 Cup Final, Gm7: Beliveau wins Conn Smythe

KEY COMPONENTS

Captain: Jean Beliveau
Conn Smythe Winner: Jean Beliveau
Stanley Cup-Winning Goal: Jean Beliveau (0:14, 1st Period, Game 7)
Head Coach: Toe Blake
General Manager: Sam Pollock

NOTABLE PLAYERS

Jean Beliveau C
Henri Richard C
Bobby Rousseau RW
J.C. Tremblay D
Gump Worsley G

ROAD TO THE CUP

Semifinals: Toronto Maple Leafs (4-2)
Stanley Cup Final: Chicago Black Hawks (4-3)

 

1966 Montreal Canadiens

The Canadiens were the NHL's best team during the regular season (41-21-8) and repeated as Stanley Cup champions to give coach Toe Blake his seventh title in 11 years behind the Montreal bench. Bobby Rousseau led the team in scoring with 30 goals and 78 points and defenseman Jacques Laperriere earned his first and only Norris Trophy. Montreal completed a rare comeback against Detroit in the Final, winning four straight games after dropping the first two contests at home. Henri Richard, who had not scored in the first five games of the series, tallied the game-winner in overtime of Game 6, marking the ninth time in NHL history that a series-winning goal had been scored in overtime. Montreal defenseman J.C. Tremblay led the team in playoff scoring with 2-9-11, while Jean-Guy Talbot hoisted the Stanley Cup for the seventh time in his career, setting a record for NHL blueliners.

KEY COMPONENTS

Captain: Jean Beliveau
Stanley Cup-Winning Goal: Henri Richard (2:20, OT, Game 6)
Head Coach: Toe Blake
General Manager: Sam Pollock

NOTABLE PLAYERS

Jean Beliveau C
Bobby Rousseau RW
Gilles Tremblay LW
J.C. Tremblay D
Gump Worsley G

ROAD TO THE CUP

Semifinals: Toronto Maple Leafs (4-0)
Stanley Cup Final: Detroit Red Wings (4-2)

 

1967 Toronto Maple Leafs

The Toronto Maple Leafs won the Stanley Cup with the oldest championship lineup ever. Backstopped by the goaltending tandem of 42-year-old Johnny Bower and 37-year-old Terry Sawchuk, the roster included seven players over 35 and 12 members over 30. The Maple Leafs rebounded from a 10-game losing streak during the regular season, leading coach Punch Imlach to take a stress-related leave of absence. King Clancy took over temporarily and the team went 7-1-2, climbing back into the playoff picture and staying there when Imlach returned. Dave Keon captured the Conn Smythe Trophy following an outstanding defensive performance. In eliminating the Chicago Black Hawks and Montreal Canadiens, Keon and the Maple Leafs faced stars including the Black Hawks' Bobby Hull and Stan Mikita, and the Canadiens' Jean Beliveau and Henri Richard. It was the last Stanley Cup of the NHL's 'Original Six' era as the League doubled in size with six expansion teams in 1967-68.

KEY COMPONENTS

Captain: George Armstrong
Conn Smythe Winner: Dave Keon
Stanley Cup-Winning Goal: Jim Pappin (19:24, 2nd Period, Game 6)
Head Coach: Punch Imlach
General Manager: Punch Imlach

NOTABLE PLAYERS

Dave Keon C
Frank Mahovlich LW
Jim Pappin RW
Tim Horton D
Johnny Bower G

ROAD TO THE CUP

Semifinals: Chicago Black Hawks (4-2)
Stanley Cup Final: Montreal Canadiens (4-2)

 

1968 Montreal Canadiens

The NHL doubled in size with the addition of six expansion teams which comprised one of two new divisions. In the playoffs, Montreal won the East Division, and St. Louis won the West Division to earn a chance at the Stanley Cup. The Blues lineup boasted several aging superstars, including two-time Vezina Trophy winner Glenn Hall, two-time Art Ross Trophy winner Dickie Moore and seven-time Norris Trophy winner Doug Harvey. Rookie defenseman Serge Savard, who would amass eight Stanley Cup rings in his career, scored his first two career playoff goals while shorthanded in Game 2 and 3 to tie a Stanley Cup Final record. Toe Blake retired after capturing his eighth Stanley Cup in 13 years as coach of the Canadiens and set a record as the first person to win a total of 11 Stanley Cup championships in a career. Blake also played on championship teams with the Montreal Maroons in 1935 and the Canadiens in 1944 and 1946.

KEY COMPONENTS

Captain: Jean Beliveau
Stanley Cup-Winning Goal: J.C. Tremblay (11:40, 3rd Period, Game 4)
Head Coach: Toe Blake
General Manager: Sam Pollock

NOTABLE PLAYERS

Jean Beliveau C
Yvan Cournoyer RW
Jacques Lemaire C
J.C. Tremblay D
Gump Worsley G

ROAD TO THE CUP

Quarterfinals: Boston Bruins (4-0
Semifinals: Chicago Black Hawks (4-1)
Stanley Cup Final: St. Louis Blues (4-0) 

 

1969 Montreal Canadiens

Facing the challenging task of replacing the legendary Toe Blake behind the Canadiens bench at the start of the season, rookie coach Claude Ruel led Montreal to a record-breaking regular season performance and second consecutive Stanley Cup. Ruel became the 11th rookie coach in NHL history to go the distance with his team. A victory over the Boston Bruins in their regular-season finale gave the Canadiens 46 wins, surpassing the total of the 1955-56 Canadiens. The two points upped their season total to 103, moving past the 101 recorded by the Detroit Red Wings in 1950-51. Facing the West Division champion St. Louis Blues in the Stanley Cup Final, goaltender Rogie Vachon limited the Blues to three goals in four outings and registered his first career playoff and only Stanley Cup Final shutout in Game 3. Serge Savard became the first defenseman to win the Conn Smythe Trophy.

KEY COMPONENTS

Captain: Jean Beliveau
Conn Smythe Winner: Serge Savard
Stanley Cup-Winning Goal: John Ferguson (3:02, 3rd Period, Game 4)
Head Coach: Claude Ruel
General Manger: Sam Pollock

NOTABLE PLAYERS

Jean Beliveau C
Yvan Cournoyer RW
Dick Duff LW
Serge Savard D
Rogie Vachon G

ROAD TO THE CUP

Quarterfinals: New York Rangers (4-0)
Semifinals: Boston Bruins (4-2)
Stanley Cup Final: St. Louis Blues (4-0)

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