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Islanders Hosting Hockey Fights Cancer Game at UBS Arena

First Hockey Fights Cancer game at UBS Arena is supported by Northwell Health

by New York Islanders Community Relations @NYIslanders / NewYorkIslanders.com

On Friday night, the UBS Arena lights will be turned lavender, as the New York Islanders hold the team's annual Hockey Fights Cancer night, supported by Northwell Health. 

After hosting Hockey Fights Cancer night in an empty building last year, this year's game, against the visiting Pittsburgh Penguins, will resemble the more traditional Hockey Fights Cancer game. 

The Islanders will wear lavender jerseys in warmups, which can be bid on until Nov. 27 at 11 p.m. et. Fans will have their opportunity to stand up to cancer, filling out "Stand Up 2 Cancer" placards and holding them up during a TV timeout. Friday's game will also feature a ceremonial puck drop, an LED bracelet giveaway, mystery pucks available for purchase and other activations and fundraisers. 


JERSEY AUCTION/FUNDRAISERS

The Islanders will wear lavender Hockey Fights Cancer jerseys during warmups, which can be bid on here until Nov. 27 at 11 p.m. et. Proceeds benefit Hockey Fights Cancer 

Fans will have the opportunity to make a donation of $45 to purchase a one-of-a-kind, special edition HFC puck that is autographed by an Islanders player. Proceeds will benefit the Islanders Hockey Fights Cancer campaign and the Northwell Health Cancer Institute. Limited quantity available. Pucks for sale at the Community Relations table located at 108/109 on the concourse.

50-50 raffle proceeds will benefit the American Cancer Society. The ACS is on a mission to free the world from cancer via funding and conducting research, sharing expert information, supporting patients, and spreading the word about prevention. All so you can live longer - and better.

The American Cancer Society is also the Islanders Hockey With A Heart charity of the game. 


    STAND UP 2 CANCER

    The Islanders are also partnering with Stand Up To Cancer for Saturday's contest. Fans can donate directly to the organization by clicking here.

    The Stand Up to Cancer mission is an important one. 

    Cancer never takes a break, and nor will Stand Up To Cancer's efforts to end this disease. In the U.S., nearly 5,000 people are diagnosed with cancer every day, and one person is lost to cancer every minute. Stand Up To Cancer (SU2C) brings together the best and the brightest in the cancer community, and by galvanizing the entertainment industry, SU2C generates awareness, educates the public on cancer prevention, and helps more people diagnosed with cancer become long-term survivors. To learn more, visit StandUpToCancer.org.

    Fans are also encouraged to print off Stand Up To Cancer placards and post to social media using #HFC to show their support for those in the fight and in remembrance of those we've lost.


    CEREMONIAL PUCK DROP

    Michael Hill, a staffer at Cohen Children's Medical Center for over six years, will be representing the children battling, or who have overcome cancer, at Cohen's. Hill is the first Hospitality Liaison assigned to deal specifically with the families of pediatric cancer patients. Hill works with Cohen's hematology oncology population that is in-patient and out-patient to provide the best experience to the families while they are here and getting them ready to leave when their treatment is over. His role is to compliment others in the hospital where he focuses on the needs of the parent whose child has cancer.

    Additionally, Cohen's had the children in the Oncology/Hematology Unit participate in a puck drawing contest. The kids used their creativity to inspire hope and they battle or are recovering from their battle.


    FLAG CAPTAIN OF THE GAME

    Carol Silva, a veteran News 12 Anchor and cancer survivor, was diagnosed with Stage 4 Lung that spread to form 12 additional tumors in her brain. Carol lives a healthy, active lifestyle and is a nonsmoker, but her cancer was tested and found to have a genetic mutation, which turned out to be a good thing, all things considered, because there was a specific medication for that mutation. Carol is now cancer free thanks to her team at Monter Cancer Center!

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