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This Date in NHL History

Aug. 23: Hockey Hall of Fame inducts Harvey

Plus: Goalie Healy, forward Ferraro born

by John Kreiser @jkreiser7713 / NHL.com Managing Editor

THIS DATE IN HISTORY: Aug. 23

1973: Doug Harvey, a star defenseman with the Montreal Canadiens during the 1950s, is among five inductees to the Hockey Hall of Fame.

Though Harvey never reaches double figures in goals or finishes a season with more than 50 points, he wins the Norris Trophy as the NHL's top defenseman a record seven times (a mark since broken by Bobby Orr), and is a First-Team All-Star 10 times. He also plays on six Stanley Cup-winning teams with the Canadiens.

But Harvey is nowhere to be found at the ceremony, where goaltender Chuck Rayner, pre-NHL star Tommy Smith, longtime referee Frank Udvari and former Canadiens owner Hartland Molson are also inducted. He's angered by the fact he wasn't inducted the previous year alongside Gordie Howe and longtime Montreal teammates Jean Beliveau and Bernie Geoffrion, so he boycotts the ceremony.

Harvey is named to the 100 Greatest NHL Players presented by Molson Canadian in 2017.

Video: Doug Harvey led Canadiens' deadly power-play unit

 

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1962: Glenn Healy is born in Pickering, Ontario. Healy spends 15 seasons in the NHL with the Los Angeles Kings, New York Islanders, New York Rangers and Toronto Maple Leafs, finishing 166-190-47 with a 3.37 goals-against average and .887 save percentage in 437 appearances. He serves as Mike Richter's backup on the Rangers' 1994 Stanley Cup-winning team. After Healy's playing career ends in 2001, he becomes a television hockey analyst.

 

1964: Ray Ferraro is born in Trail, British Columbia. The Hartford Whalers select him in the fifth round (No. 88) at the 1982 NHL Draft; he comes to the League in 1984-85 and plays 18 seasons with six teams, and he's a teammate of Healy's with the Islanders (1990-93) and Rangers (1995-96). Ferraro finishes his NHL career in 2002 with 898 points (408 goals, 490 assists) in 1,258 games; like his former teammate, he soon goes into broadcasting as an analyst.

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