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Super 16

Super 16: Brodeur, Lundqvist, Price among top goalies of expansion era

Roy finishes second in rankings that include 10 Hall of Famers

by Dan Rosen @drosennhl / NHL.com Senior Writer

Super 16 Classic Edition: Goalies

Check out the Super 16 goalies of all-time

Martin Brodeur and Patrick Roy top the list of the best post-expansion goalies in Super 16 Classic Edition, presented by New Amsterdam Vodka

  • 02:11 •

The NHL season has been paused since March 12 due to concerns surrounding the coronavirus, but the weekly Super 16 rolls on in a revamped form, looking at the history of the game. This week, it's the top 16 goalies from 1967 to present day, the NHL expansion era.

It wasn't unanimous like last week, when Wayne Gretzky was voted the top center, but almost.

Martin Brodeur was ranked first by 11 of 14 participating NHL.com staff members, good enough to land at No. 1 on this Super 16, the best NHL goalies of the expansion era.

Dominik Hasek was ranked first by two of the voters, and Patrick Roy received top billing from one.

Three active goalies, Marc-Andre Fleury of the Vegas Golden Knights, Henrik Lundqvist of the New York Rangers and Carey Price of the Montreal Canadiens, landed in the Super 16.

Thirty-one goalies were ranked by at least one of the voters.

To create this Super 16, each of the 14 participating NHL.com staff members put together his or her version of what it should look like. Those were submitted and a point total was assigned to each.

The goalie picked first was given 16 points, second got 15, third 14 and so on down to No. 16, who got one point.

Here is the Super 16, best goalies from 1967 to present day:

 

1. Martin Brodeur

Total points: 218

Hall of Fame induction: 2018

Brodeur, the longtime goalie for the New Jersey Devils, has the most wins (691), shutouts (125), games (1,266) and saves (28,928) in NHL history. He had a 2.24 goals-against average and .912 save percentage in his NHL career, which ended with seven games for the St. Louis Blues in 2014-15, the only time he played for a team other than the Devils. He went 113-91 with a 2.02 GAA, a .919 save percentage and an NHL-record 24 shutouts in the Stanley Cup Playoffs. He is a three-time Stanley Cup champion (1995, 2000, 2003), was voted winner of the Calder Trophy as NHL rookie of the year in 1994 and of the Vezina Trophy as the best goalie in the NHL four times (2003, 2004, 2007, 2008), and won Olympic gold with Canada twice (2002, 2010). Brodeur was selected for the First NHL All-Star Team three times (2003, 2004, 2007) and the Second NHL All-Star Team four times (1997, 1998, 2006, 2008). He's also the only NHL goalie to be credited with scoring three goals (two in the regular season, one in the playoffs).

Video: Super 16: Best goalies of all time

 

2. Patrick Roy

Total points: 205

Hall of Fame induction: 2006

Roy, who played for the Montreal Canadiens and Colorado Avalanche, is second in NHL history with 551 wins and third with 1,029 games. He had a 2.54 GAA, a .910 save percentage and 66 shutouts in his NHL career. He is first in NHL playoff history with 151 wins and 247 games, when he had a 2.30 GAA, a .918 save percentage and 23 shutouts. He won the Stanley Cup four times, twice with Montreal (1986, 1993) and twice with Colorado (1996, 2001), and was voted winner of the Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff MVP in 1986, 1993 and 2001. He won the Vezina Trophy three times (1989, 1990, 1992) and was on the First NHL All-Star Team four times (1989, 1990, 1992, 2002) and the Second NHL All-Star Team twice (1988, 1991).

 

3. Dominik Hasek

Total points: 188

Hall of Fame induction: 2014

Hasek was voted winner of the Hart Trophy as NHL MVP twice (1997, 1998) and of the Vezina Trophy six times, all from 1994-2001. He won the Stanley Cup twice with the Detroit Red Wings (2002, 2008). He had 389 wins, a 2.20 GAA, a .922 save percentage and 81 shutouts in 735 games for the Red Wings, Ottawa Senators, Buffalo Sabres and Chicago Blackhawks. He was 65-49 with a 2.02 GAA, a .925 save percentage and 14 shutouts in the NHL playoffs. He was on the First NHL All-Star Team six times (1994, 1995, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2001). Hasek won Olympic gold with the Czech Republic in 1998.

 

4. Ken Dryden

Total points: 164

Hall of Fame induction: 1983

Dryden played for the Canadiens from 1970-79 and won the Stanley Cup six times (1971, 1973, 1976-79), the Vezina Trophy five times (1973, 1976-79), the Conn Smythe Trophy in 1971 and the Calder Trophy in 1972. His 258 wins were second during the 10 NHL seasons from 1970-79 behind Tony Esposito's 273, but Dryden did not play in 1973-74. He was named to the First NHL All-Star Team in 1973 and from 1976-79 (Second NHL All-Star Team in 1972). He had a 2.24 GAA, a .921 save percentage and 46 shutouts in 397 games. He went 80-32 with a 2.41 GAA and .915 save percentage for Montreal in the playoffs.

Video: Ken Dryden won Conn Smythe before he won Calder

 

5. Tony Esposito

Total points: 139

Hall of Fame induction: 1988

Esposito was a three-time Vezina Trophy winner (1970, 1972 and 1974) with Chicago. He won the Stanley Cup with the Canadiens in 1969 and the Calder Trophy the following season, his first of 15 with the Black Hawks. He had 423 wins (10th in NHL history), a 2.93 GAA, a .906 save percentage and 76 shutouts (tied for 10th) in 886 games.

 

6. Grant Fuhr

Total points: 137

Hall of Fame induction: 2003

Fuhr won the Stanley Cup five times with the Edmonton Oilers from 1984-90 and the Vezina Trophy in 1988. His 403 wins in 868 games are 12th in NHL history, and he is third with 92 postseason victories. Fuhr had a 3.38 GAA and .887 save percentage in the regular season in his NHL career but a 2.92 GAA and .898 save percentage in the playoffs.

Video: Grant Fuhr first black player in Hall of Fame

 

7. Bernie Parent

Total points: 123

Hall of Fame induction: 1984

Parent's best years came with the Philadelphia Flyers in the mid-1970s, when he helped them to back-to-back Stanley Cup championships in 1974 and 1975, winning the Conn Smythe Trophy each year. He also won the Vezina for the 1973-74 and 1974-75 seasons. Parent finished his NHL career with 271 wins, a 2.55 GAA, a .915 save percentage and 54 shutouts. He had 38 wins, a 2.44 GAA and a .916 save percentage in the playoffs, and all six of his postseason shutouts came during Philadelphia's two Cup runs.

 

8. Ed Belfour

Total points: 108

Hall of Fame induction: 2011

Belfour is fourth in NHL history in regular-season wins (484) and tied with Billy Smith for fourth in playoff victories (88). He won the Stanley Cup with the Dallas Stars in 1999. He won the Vezina and Calder trophies with the Blackhawks in 1991 and won the Vezina again in 1993.

 

9. Billy Smith

Total points: 94

Hall of Fame induction: 1993

Smith was the goalie during the New York Islanders' dynasty in the early 1980s. He helped them to four straight Stanley Cup championships from 1980-83, winning the Conn Smythe Trophy in 1983. He won 305 regular-season games, including an NHL career-high 32 in 1981-82, when he won the Vezina.

Video: Memories: Smith is first goalie credited with a goal

 

10. Henrik Lundqvist

Total points: 91

Hall of Fame induction: Not eligible, still playing

Lundqvist, the longtime No. 1 for the Rangers, is sixth in NHL history with 459 wins, second most in the League since 2005-06 behind Marc-Andre Fleury's 462. He has a 2.43 GAA, a .918 save percentage and 64 shutouts in 887 games, the most in the League since 2005-06. He is second in playoff wins (61) and games (128) in that span behind Fleury (78, 142). He has a 2.28 GAA and .922 save percentage in his NHL postseason career. Lundqvist won Olympic gold with Sweden in 2006 and was named to the NHL Second All-Decade Team for the 2010s.

 

11. Roberto Luongo

Total points: 85

Hall of Fame induction: Not eligible, recently retired

Luongo is third in NHL history in wins (489) behind Brodeur and Roy, and he is second in games (1,044) behind Brodeur. He had a 2.52 GAA, a .919 save percentage and 77 shutouts. Luongo never won the Stanley Cup, but he got to Game 7 of the Cup Final in 2011 with the Vancouver Canucks against the Boston Bruins. He won Olympic gold with Canada in 2010.

 

12. Marc-Andre Fleury

Total points: 70

Hall of Fame induction: Not eligible, still playing

Fleury is a three-time Stanley Cup champion (2009, 2016, 2017), all with the Pittsburgh Penguins. He has reached the Stanley Cup Final five times, including with the Vegas Golden Knights in 2018, capping their inaugural season. He is fifth in NHL history in regular-season wins (466), and the 78 postseason wins are seventh. He was named to the NHL First All-Decade Team for the 2010s.

Video: EDM@VGK: Fleury powers Vegas with 61st NHL shutout

 

13. Carey Price

Total points: 51

Hall of Fame induction: Not eligible, still playing

Price was voted as the best goalie in the NHL in a player poll conducted by the NHL Players' Association this year. He received 41.55 percent of the vote from 515 players. Next closest was Tampa Bay Lightning goalie Andrei Vasilevskiy (17.09 percent). Price has 348 wins, a 2.49 GAA, a .917 save percentage and 48 shutouts in 682 NHL games, all with the Canadiens. He won the Hart and Vezina trophies in 2015 after he went 44-16-6 with a 1.96 GAA and .933 save percentage. He won Olympic gold in 2014 and helped Canada win the World Cup of Hockey 2016.

 

14. Curtis Joseph

Total points: 35

Hall of Fame induction: N/A

Joseph is seventh in NHL history with 454 wins, having been passed by Lundqvist and Fleury this season, and with 133 playoff games. He never won the Stanley Cup or a major individual NHL award, but he was known for his longevity. His best years came with the Toronto Maple Leafs from 1998-2002, when he went 133-88-27 with a 2.43 GAA, a .912 save percentage and 17 shutouts. Toronto made the playoffs each of those four seasons, reaching the Eastern Conference Final in 1999 and 2002.

 

15. Rogie Vachon

Total points: 29

Hall of Fame induction: 2016

Vachon had 353 wins, including 51 shutouts, in 795 games with the Canadiens, Los Angeles Kings, Red Wings and Bruins. He won the Stanley Cup with the Canadiens in 1968, 1969 and 1971. He won the Canada Cup with Canada in 1976, when he was named team MVP. He shared the Vezina Trophy with Gump Worsley in 1968.

 

16. Tim Thomas

Total points: 27

Hall of Fame induction: N/A

Thomas packed a lot into a career that mostly spanned from 2005-14. He won the Stanley Cup and Conn Smythe Trophy with the Bruins in 2011, when he won the Vezina for the second time (also 2009). Thomas was 214-145-49 with a 2.52 GAA and .920 save percentage in 426 games.

 

Others receiving points: Jonathan Quick 21, Gerry Cheevers 20, Tuukka Rask 17, Ed Giacomin 15, Chris Osgood 14, Jacques Plante 12, Mike Vernon 11, Ryan Miller 8, Mike Richter 6, Pekka Rinne 4, Andy Moog 3, Ron Hextall 3, Sergei Bobrovsky 3, Evgeni Nabokov 2, Tom Barrasso 1

 

HERE'S HOW WE RANKED 'EM

AMALIE BENJAMIN

1. Dominik Hasek; 2. Patrick Roy; 3. Martin Brodeur; 4. Ken Dryden; 5. Bernie Parent; 6. Tony Esposito; 7. Billy Smith; 8. Roberto Luongo; 9. Henrik Lundqvist; 10. Ed Belfour; 11. Grant Fuhr; 12. Curtis Joseph; 13. Gerry Cheevers; 14. Rogie Vachon; 15. Mike Vernon; 16. Tuukka Rask

BRIAN COMPTON

1. Martin Brodeur; 2. Ken Dryden; 3. Dominik Hasek; 4. Billy Smith; 5. Patrick Roy; 6. Bernie Parent; 7. Grant Fuhr; 8. Tim Thomas; 9. Roberto Luongo; 10. Tuukka Rask; 11. Tony Esposito; 12. Ed Belfour; 13. Henrik Lundqvist; 14. Rogie Vachon; 15. Marc-Andre Fleury; 16. Carey Price

NICHOLAS J. COTSONIKA

1. Dominik Hasek; 2. Ken Dryden; 3. Patrick Roy; 4. Martin Brodeur; 5. Bernie Parent; 6. Tim Thomas; 7. Ed Belfour; 8. Tony Esposito; 9. Ed Giacomin; 10. Billy Smith; 11. Grant Fuhr; 12. Henrik Lundqvist; 13. Carey Price; 14. Sergei Bobrovsky; 15. Ron Hextall; 16. Rogie Vachon

WILLIAM DOUGLAS

1. Martin Brodeur; 2. Patrick Roy; 3. Grant Fuhr; 4. Dominik Hasek; 5. Jacques Plante; 6. Tony Esposito; 7. Billy Smith; 8. Bernie Parent; 9. Ken Dryden; 10. Carey Price; 11. Rogie Vachon; 12. Gerry Cheevers; 13. Henrik Lundqvist; 14. Marc-Andre Fleury; 15. Ed Giacomin; 16. Jonathan Quick

TOM GULITTI

1. Martin Brodeur; 2. Patrick Roy; 3. Dominik Hasek; 4. Grant Fuhr; 5. Ken Dryden; 6. Billy Smith; 7. Tony Esposito; 8. Bernie Parent; 9. Gerry Cheevers; 10. Rogie Vachon; 11. Ed Belfour; 12. Ed Giacomin; 13. Carey Price; 14. Tim Thomas; 15. Marc-Andre Fleury; 16. Mike Richter.

ADAM KIMELMAN

1. Martin Brodeur; 2. Patrick Roy; 3. Dominik Hasek; 4. Ken Dryden; 5. Grant Fuhr; 6. Bernie Parent; 7. Carey Price; 8. Marc-Andre Fleury; 9. Tony Esposito; 10. Henrik Lundqvist; 11. Jonathan Quick; 12. Mike Richter; 13. Rogie Vachon; 14. Ed Belfour; 15. Roberto Luongo; 16. Ron Hextall

ROBERT LAFLAMME

1. Patrick Roy; 2. Martin Brodeur; 3. Ken Dryden; 4. Grant Fuhr; 5. Tony Esposito; 6. Dominik Hasek; 7. Marc-Andre Fleury; 8. Ed Belfour; 9. Roberto Luongo; 10. Billy Smith; 11. Bernie Parent; 12. Curtis Joseph; 13. Chris Osgood; 14. Henrik Lundqvist; 15. Mike Vernon; 16. Rogie Vachon

MIKE G. MORREALE

1. Martin Brodeur; 2. Patrick Roy; 3. Ken Dryden; 4. Dominik Hasek; 5. Bernie Parent; 6. Grant Fuhr; 7. Tony Esposito; 8. Billy Smith; 9. Ed Belfour; 10. Marc-Andre Fleury; 11. Tuukka Rask; 12. Curtis Joseph; 13. Tim Thomas; 14. Roberto Luongo; 15. Henrik Lundqvist; 16. Carey Price

TRACEY MYERS

1. Martin Brodeur; 2. Patrick Roy; 3. Ed Belfour; 4. Henrik Lundqvist; 5. Roberto Luongo; 6. Tony Esposito; 7. Curtis Joseph; 8. Dominik Hasek; 9. Chris Osgood; 10. Ryan Miller; 11. Grant Fuhr; 12. Mike Vernon; 13. Pekka Rinne; 14. Andy Moog; 15. Evgeni Nabokov; 16. Tom Barrasso

BILL PRICE

1. Martin Brodeur; 2. Patrick Roy; 3. Dominik Hasek; 4. Ken Dryden; 5. Roberto Luongo; 6. Grant Fuhr; 7. Henrik Lundqvist; 8. Ed Belfour; 9. Marc-Andre Fleury; 10. Tony Esposito; 11. Jonathan Quick; 12. Billy Smith; 13. Carey Price; 14. Bernie Parent; 15. Tuukka Rask; 16. Curtis Joseph

SHAWN P. ROARKE

1. Martin Brodeur; 2. Dominik Hasek; 3. Ken Dryden; 4. Patrick Roy; 5. Tony Esposito; 6. Roberto Luongo; 7. Bernie Parent; 8. Henrik Lundqvist; 9. Carey Price; 10. Billy Smith; 11. Grant Fuhr; 12. Ed Belfour; 13. Curtis Joseph; 14. Marc-Andre Fleury; 15. Mike Vernon; 16. Rogie Vachon

DAN ROSEN

1. Martin Brodeur; 2. Patrick Roy; 3. Dominik Hasek; 4. Ken Dryden; 5. Henrik Lundqvist; 6. Grant Fuhr; 7. Bernie Parent; 8. Ed Belfour; 9. Marc-Andre Fleury; 10. Tony Esposito; 11. Roberto Luongo; 12. Jonathan Quick; 13. Carey Price; 14. Billy Smith; 15. Rogie Vachon; 16. Tuukka Rask

DAVE STUBBS

1. Martin Brodeur; 2. Patrick Roy; 3. Tony Esposito; 4. Ed Belfour; 5. Roberto Luongo; 6. Dominik Hasek; 7. Marc-Andre Fleury; 8. Grant Fuhr; 9. Henrik Lundqvist; 10. Ken Dryden; 11. Bernie Parent; 12. Billy Smith; 13. Carey Price; 14. Gerry Cheevers; 15. Chris Osgood; 16. Ryan Miller

MIKE ZEISBERGER

1. Martin Brodeur; 2. Patrick Roy; 3. Dominik Hasek; 4. Ken Dryden; 5. Bernie Parent; 6. Tony Esposito; 7. Ed Belfour; 8. Grant Fuhr 9. Marc-Andre Fleury; 10. Billy Smith; 11. Henrik Lundqvist; 12. Curtis Joseph; 13. Carey Price; 14. Jonathan Quick; 15. Roberto Luongo; 16. Rogie Vachon

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