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Brodeur does it again in Devils' win over Flyers

by Brian Compton / NHL.com
Martin Brodeur did it again on Sunday afternoon.

The future Hall of Famer picked up his second shutout in three games since returning from injury as he made 27 saves in the New Jersey Devils' 3-0 win against the Philadelphia Flyers at the Prudential Center.

It was the 100th shutout of Brodeur's spectacular career, leaving him just three behind Terry Sawchuk for the most in NHL history.

''It's a big number, it's kind of hard to believe,'' Brodeur said of his shutout total. ''You get to different numbers and at times you think, 'OK, it's just another one.' When you get to a round number, it looks more impressive.''
   
Brodeur has allowed two goals in three starts, as he's stopped 46 of 48 shots with two shutouts. He has four shutouts in 13 games this season.
   
''This is as good as it gets,'' he said.
   
The offense in front of him has been pretty good, too. The Devils have outscored their opponents 14-2 since his return and Sunday's win moved them nine points ahead of Philadelphia in the Atlantic Division race. New Jersey is now just eight points behind Boston for the overall lead in the Eastern Conference.
   
''Any goalie, that's your dream team in front of you, one that scores goals and is responsible defensively,'' said Brodeur, who now has 547 career victories. ''I don't think we are cutting corners in our own zone. We've been really disciplined in these three games and that makes a big difference in keeping the puck out of your net.''
   
The loss was the fourth in 11 games (7-3-1) for the Flyers, who failed to score despite the return of Danny Briere after a 36-game absence due to abdominal-groin surgery.
   
''Not a very good one from our part,'' Flyers left wing Simon Gagne said. ''If you shoot 25 or 26 shots, it's tough to win hockey games, especially against Martin Brodeur. We did not test him enough and they got the best of us.''
   
New Jersey didn't need much time to grab the lead, as captain Jamie Langenbrunner scored just 3:51 into the game. Zach Parise -- who had two goals in Saturday's 7-2 win over Florida -- chased down the puck in the right corner and sent a cross-ice pass to Langenbrunner, who fired a one-timer from the left circle past Martin Biron for his 20th goal of the season and the 200th of his career.
   
''It's easy to play in this League when you have the lead and you are not down right away,'' Parise said.
   
Brodeur, who missed 50 games after having surgery to repair a torn biceps in his left elbow, kept the Devils front when he slid across his crease to stop Mike Richards in close after he received a pretty feed from Gagne.

''I was by myself with Brodeur and saw Richie on the corner on the left side. I thought it would be open net for him,'' Gagne said. ''I thought he read the play pretty good and Marty made a great save on that.''
   
New Jersey outshot Philadelphia 18-6 in the second period and grabbed a 2-0 lead just 37 seconds into the frame on Brian Gionta's 14th goal of the season. With the teams at even strength, Gionta redirected Johnny Oduya's shot from the point past Biron for his 14th goal of the season.
   
"It's a big number, it's kind of hard to believe.  You get to different numbers and at times you think, 'OK, it's just another one.' When you get to a round number, it looks more impressive." -- Martin Brodeur on his 100th career shutout
After Oduya gave the Devils a 3-0 lead at 4:48 of the third, Brodeur preserved the shutout by denying Scottie Upshall twice and a tremendous save on Mike Knuble with 5:46 remaining. New Jersey improved to 29-0-1 when leading after two periods.
   
''I definitely feel more tested today than any of the other games I played so far,'' Brodeur said.

Material from wire services was used in this report.



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