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The Stanley Cup Stanley Cup Notebook

The Original Bowl
The bowl that currently sits atop the Stanley Cup is a carefully constructed copy of the original bowl purchased by Lord Stanley in 1893. The original trophy was retired in 1969 because it had become brittle and easily damaged. It can still be viewed and studied at the Hockey Hall of Fame in Toronto.

Growth of the Cup
In the early days, players added their names to the trophy by scratching them onto the original bowl with a knife or a nail. From the 1890s to the 1930s, various bands were added to the bottom of the bowl to hold the names of the winning teams and their players. Throughout this time, the appearance of the Cup kept changing almost from year to year. In 1939, the Stanley Cup was given a standardized form as a long, cigar-shaped trophy. It stayed this way until 1948, when it was rebuilt as a two-piece trophy with a wide barrel-shaped base and a removable bowl and collar. The modern one-piece Cup was introduced in 1958.

Women on the Cup
Eight women have had their names engraved on the Stanley Cup: Marguerite Norris (1955) was president of the Detroit Red Wings; Sonia Scurfield (1989) was a co-owner of the Calgary Flames; Marie-Denise DeBartolo York (1991) was president of the Pittsburgh Penguins; Marian Ilitch (1997, 1998) was a co-owner of the Detroit Red Wings; Denise Ilitch (1997, 1998) with the Detroit Red Wings, Lisa Ilitch (1997, 1998) with the Detroit Red Wings and Carole Ilitch Trepeck (1997, 1998) with the Detroit Red Wings. Charlotte Grahame's name was added in 2001 when Colorado won.

Playoff Postponements
The assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. forced the postponement of three series games during the quarterfinal rounds of the 1968 Stanley Cup playoffs. Match-ups between the New York Rangers and Chicago Blackhawks, St. Louis Blues and Philadelphia Flyers, and Minnesota North Stars and Los Angeles Kings were delayed by a minimum of two days.

Stanley Before Calder
Tony Esposito and Danny Grant both won the Stanley Cup one year and the Calder the next with different teams. Grant was a member of the 1968 Cup-winning Montreal Canadiens before winning the Calder as the NHL's top rookie in 1969 with Minnesota. Tony Esposito won the Cup with the Canadiens in 1969 and the Calder the following season with the Chicago Blackhawks. A player remains eligible for the Calder if he has played 25-or-fewer NHL regular-season games. Perhaps the most popular member of this family is the legendary goaltender Ken Dryden. Dryden played his first NHL game in 1970-71. Six regular season games actually. He then went on to play 20 playoff games, win the Stanley Cup and take the Conn Smythe (MVP) Award in the process. Since he has so few games played that season, he was considered a rookie in 1971-72 and lead all to take the Calder Cup.

Conn Smythe Trophy Update
A total of 36 different players have won the Conn Smythe Trophy, awarded to the most valuable player to his team in the playoffs. The trophy was first awarded in 1965. Five players - Bobby Orr, Bernie Parent, Wayne Gretzky and Mario Lemieux - have won the award twice. Patrick Roy is the only three time winner. Four players - Roger Crozier of the 1966 Detroit Red Wings, Glenn Hall of the 1968 St. Louis Blues, Reg Leach of the 1976 Philadelphia Flyers, Ron Hextall of the 1987 Philadelphia Flyers and Jean-Sebastien Giguere of the 2003 Mighty Ducks of Anaheim - have won the Conn Smythe Trophy as members of losing teams in the Finals. Twenty-year-old Patrick Roy of the 1986 Montreal Canadiens was the youngest player ever to win the Conn Smythe Trophy. The Conn Smythe Trophy is voted upon by the Professional Hockey Writers Association (PHWA) at the conclusion of the final game of the Stanley Cup Finals.

Shutouts
Since the NHL was established in 1917, at least one shutout has been recorded in every playoff year except 1959 (18 games).

Charlie Gardiner
Gardiner played seven seasons for the Chicago Blackhawks
Crease Captain on the Cup
Charlie Gardiner, captain of the Chicago Blackhawks in 1934, is the only goaltender to have his name appear on the Cup as the captain of a Cup-winning team.

U.S.-Based Teams in the Stanley Cup Championship
The 1916 Portland Rosebuds were the first team based in the United States to participate in a Stanley Cup championship, while the 1917 Seattle Metropolitans were the first to win the Cup. The Detroit Red Wings have won 10 Stanley Cups, more than any other American team, and were the first to win back-to-back titles (1936 and 1937).

Sub-.500 Teams in the Stanley Cup Championship
Fifteen teams have advanced to the Stanley Cup Championship after posting regular-season records below the .500-mark. The complete list follows:

Year Team Record
1991 Minnesota North Stars 27-39-14
1982 Vancouver Canucks 30-33-17
1968 St. Louis Blues 27-31-16
1961 Detroit Red Wings 25-29-16
1959 Toronto Maple Leafs 27-32-11
1958 Boston Bruins 27-28-15
1953 Boston Bruins 28-29-13
1951 Montreal Canadiens 25-30-15
1950 New York Rangers 28-31-11
1949 Toronto Maple Leafs 22-25-13
1944 Chicago Blackhawks 22-23- 5
1942 Detroit Red Wings 19-25- 4
1939 Toronto Maple Leafs 19-20- 9
1938 Chicago Blackhawks 14-25- 9
1937 New York Rangers 19-20- 9

Johnny Bower
Bower was 44 when he played in the Stanley Cup playoffs
The Oldest Goalie
When Johnny Bower appeared in his last playoff game on April 6, 1969, at the age of 44 years, four months and 38 days, he became the oldest goalie to appear in an NHL playoff game. Lester Patrick at 44 years, three months, and eight days and Jacques Plante at 44 years, two months, and 19 days are more-than-honorable mentions.

Eye in the Sky
For the first time in NHL history, a playoff result was determined by a video replay during the 1992 Division Semifinals between the Detroit Red Wings and Minnesota North Stars. In overtime Sergei Fedorov's shot appeared to hit the crossbar. After a stop in play, referee Rob Shick consulted the supervisor of officials and video-replay official Wally Harris, who determined that the puck had entered the net, giving the Wings a 1-0 victory.

Back-to-Back Winners
Many players have won consecutive championships in their careers, but few have ever accomplished the feat with two different teams. One player, Eddie Gerard, won the Cup with the 1921 Ottawa Senators, 1922 Toronto St. Pats and again in 1923 with the Senators. A total of 11 different players have accomplished the feat:

Player First Champion Second Champion
Cory Stillman 2004 Tampa Bay 2006 Carolina
Claude Lemieux 1995 New Jersey 1996 Colorado
Al Arbour 1961 Chicago 1962 Toronto
Ed Litzenberger 1961 Chicago 1962 Toronto
Ab McDonald 1960 Montreal 1961 Chicago
Eddie Gerard 1922 Toronto 1923 Ottawa
Lionel Conacher 1934 Chicago 1935 Montreal
Eddie Gerard 1921 Ottawa 1922 Toronto
Harry Holmes 1917 Seattle 1918 Toronto
Bruce Stuart 1908 Montreal 1909 Ottawa
Art Ross 1907 Kenora 1908 Montreal
Jack Marshall 1901 Winnipeg 1902 Montreal

Penalty Shots in the Stanley Cup Championship
A total of eight penalty shots have been awarded to players in Stanley Cup Championship history:
Date Shooter Goalie Result
June 6, 2007 Antoine Vermette (Ott) J.S. Giguere (Ana) Save
June 5, 2006 Chris Pronger (Edm) Cam Ward (Car) Goal
June 7, 1994 Pavel Bure (Van) Mike Richter (NYR) Save
May 18, 1990 Petr Klima (Edm) Rejean Lemelin (Bos) Save
May 30, 1985 Dave Poulin (Phi) Grant Fuhr (Edm) Save
May 28, 1985 Ron Sutter (Phi) Grant Fuhr (Edm) Save
May 16, 1971 Frank Mahovlich (Mtl) Tony Esposito (Chi) Save
April 13, 1944 Virgil Johnson (Chi) Bill Durnan (Mtl) Save
April 15, 1937 Alex Shibicky (NYR) Earl Robertson (Det) Save

Canadiens Own Mark for Pro Titles
The Montreal Canadiens have won 24 Stanley Cup Championships, more than any other team. The total is the second greatest number of championships in the history of professional sports. Major League Baseball's New York Yankees have won 26 World Series titles.

Gold Medalist and Stanley Cup Champion
New York Islanders' defenseman Ken Morrow was the first player in hockey history to win both an Olympic Gold Medal and a Stanley Cup in the same year. After helping the United States Olympic team win the gold medal at the 1980 Winter Games in Lake Placid, Morrow joined the New York Islanders and helped them win the first of their four consecutive Stanley Cup championships. In 2002, Detroit teammates Steve Yzerman and Brendan Shanahan helped lead Canada to a gold-medal win against the United States. Four months later, they celebrated the Red Wings' third Championship in six years, a five-game defeat of the Carolina Hurricanes.


Stanley Cup-Winning Goals
The following is a list of the players who have scored the game winning goal in the deciding game of the Stanley Cup Finals:

Year Player, Team Time of Goal Period Score Series
2008 Henrik Zetterberg, Detroit 7:36 3rd 3-2 4-2
2007 Travis Moen, Anaheim 15:44 2nd 6-2 4-1
2006 Frantisek Kaberle, Carolina 4:18 2nd 3-1 4-3
2004 Ruslan Fedotenko, Tampa Bay 14:38 2nd 2-1 4-3
2003 Mike Rupp, New Jersey 2:22 2nd 3-0 4-3
2002 Brendan Shanhan, Detroit 14:04 2nd 3-1 4-1
2001 Alex Tanguay, Colorado 4:57 2nd 3-1 4-3
2000 Jason Arnott, New Jersey 8:20 2nd OT 2-1 4-2
1999 Brett Hull, Dallas 14:51 3rd OT 2-1 4-2
1998 Martin Lapointe, Detroit 2:26 2nd 4-1 4-0
1997 Darren McCarty, Detroit 13:02 2nd 2-1 4-0
1996 Uwe Krupp, Colorado 44:31 OT 1-0 4-0
1995 Neal Broten, New Jersey 7:56 2nd 5-2 4-0
1994 Mark Messier, NY Rangers 13:29 2nd 3-2 4-3
1993 Kirk Muller, Montreal 3:51 2nd 4-1 4-1
1992 Ron Francis, Pittsburgh 7:59 3rd 6-5 4-0
1991 Ulf Samuelsson, Pittsburgh 2:00 1st 8-0 4-2
1990 Craig Simpson, Edmonton 9:31 2nd 4-1 4-1
1989 Doug Gilmour, Calgary 11:02 3rd 4-2 4-2
1988 Wayne Gretzky, Edmonton 9:44 2nd 6-3 4-0
1987 Jari Kurri, Edmonton 14:59 2nd 3-1 4-3
1986 Bobby Smith, Montreal 10:30 3rd 4-3 4-1
1985 Paul Coffey, Edmonton 17:57 1st 8-3 4-1
1984 Ken Linseman, Edmonton 0:38 2nd 5-2 4-1
1983 Mike Bossy, NY Islanders 12:39 1st 4-2 4-0
1982 Mike Bossy, NY Islanders 5:00 2nd 3-1 4-0
1981 Wayne Merrick, NY Islanders 5:37 1st 5-1 4-1
1980 Bob Nystrom, NY Islanders 7:11 OT 5-4 4-2
1979 Jacques Lemaire, Montreal 1:02 2nd 4-1 4-1
1978 Mario Tremblay, Montreal 9:20 1st 4-1 4-2
1977 Jacques Lemaire, Montreal 4:32 OT 2-1 4-1
1976 Guy Lafleur, Montreal 14:18 3rd 5-3 4-0
1975 Bob Kelly, Philadelphia 0:11 3rd 2-0 4-2
1974 Rick MacLeish, Philadelphia 14:48 1st 1-0 4-2
1973 Yvan Cournoyer, Montreal 8:13 3rd 6-4 4-2
1972 Bobby Orr, Boston 11:18 1st 3-0 4-2
1971 Henri Richard, Montreal 2:34 3rd 3-2 4-3
1970 Bobby Orr, Boston 0:40 OT 4-3 4-0
1969 John Ferguson, Montreal 3:02 3rd 2-1 4-1
1968 JC Tremblay, Montreal 11:40 3rd 3-2 4-0
1967 Jim Pappin, Toronto 19.24 2nd 3-1 4-2
1966 Henri Richard, Montreal 2:20 OT 3-2 4-2
1965 Jean Beliveau, Montreal 0:14 1st 4-0 4-3
1964 Andy Bathgate, Toronto 3:04 1st 4-0 4-3
1963 Eddie Shack, Toronto 13:28 3rd 3-1 4-1
1962 Dick Duff, Toronto 14:14 3rd 2-1 4-2
1961 Ab McDonald, Chicago 18:49 2nd 5-1 4-2
1960 Jean Beliveau, Montreal 8:16 1st 4-0 4-0
1959 Marcel Bonin, Montreal 9:55 2nd 5-3 4-1
1958 Bernie Geoffrion, Montreal 19:26 2nd 5-3 4-2
1957 Dickie Moore, Montreal 0:14 2nd 5-1 4-1
1956 Maurice Richard, Montreal 15:08 2nd 3-1 4-1
1955 Gordie Howe, Detroit 19:49 2nd 3-1 4-3
1954 Tony Leswick, Detroit 4:20 OT 2-1 4-3
1953 Elmer Lach, Montreal 1:22 OT 1-0 4-1
1952 Metro Prystai, Detroit 6:50 1st 3-0 4-0
1951 Bill Barilko, Toronto 2:53 OT 3-2 4-1
1950 Pete Babando, Detroit 28:31 OT 4-3 4-3
1949 Cal Gardner, Toronto 19:45 2nd 3-1 4-0
1948 Harry Watson, Toronto 11:13 1st 7-2 4-0
1947 Ted Kennedy, Toronto 14:39 3rd 2-1 4-2
1946 Toe Blake, Montreal 11:06 3rd 6-3 4-1
1945 Babe Pratt, Toronto 12:14 3rd 2-1 4-3
1944 Toe Blake, Montreal 9:12 OT 5-4 4-0
1943 Joe Carveth, Detroit 12:09 1st 2-0 4-0
1942 Pete Langelle, Toronto 9:48 3rd 3-1 4-3
1941 Bobby Bauer, Boston 8:43 2nd 3-1 4-0
1940 Bryan Hextall, NY Rangers 2:07 OT 3-2 4-2
1939 Roy Conacher, Boston 17:54 2nd 3-1 4-1
1938 Carl Voss, Chicago 16:45 2nd 4-3 3-1
1937 Marty Barry, Detroit 19:22 1st 3-0 3-2
1936 Pete Kelly, Detroit 9:45 3rd 3-2 3-1
1935 Baldy Northcott, Maroons 16:18 2nd 4-1 3-0
1934 Mush March, Chicago 30:05 OT 1-0 3-1
1933 Bill Cook, NY Rangers 7:34 OT 1-0 3-1
1932 Ace Bailey, Toronto 15:07 3rd 6-4 3-0
1931 Johnny Gagnon, Montreal 9:59 2nd 2-0 3-2
1930 Howie Morenz, Montreal 1:00 2nd 4-3 2-0
1929 Bill Carson, Boston 18:02 3rd 2-1 2-0
1928 Frank Boucher, NY Rangers 3:35 3rd 2-1 3-2
1927 Cy Denneny, Ottawa 7:30 2nd 3-1 2-0
           
           

Quote of the Day

It's pretty crazy, but believe me when I say we didn't draft these players with the mindset we had to because they had good hockey-playing dads. It just turned out that way. But we're certainly glad they're a part of our organization.

— Arizona Coyotes director of amateur scouting Tim Bernhardt regarding the coincidence that six of the organization's top prospects are sons of former NHL players