Sign in with your NHL account:
  • Submit
  • Or
  • Sign in with Google
 
SHARE
Posted On Wednesday, 05.11.2011 / 2:27 PM

By Brian Hedger -  NHL.com Correspondent /NHL.com - 2011 WCSF: San Jose-Detroit Live Blog

Bertuzzi the quote machine?

Detroit power forward Todd Bertuzzi isn't usually the most quotable figure in the Red Wings' locker room, but he had a couple of zingers on Wednesday at the airport before leaving for San Jose.

In talking about playing Game 7 on Thursday and the excitement that comes along with it, Bertuzzi said: "It's the first time I've seen guys that excited to get on a plane for seven hours."

Then, when asked if he thinks the Red Wings might get injured forward Johan Franzen (sore ankle) back for Game 7, Bertuzzi quipped: "Who knows? I thought we were leaving yesterday, so it shows how much I know what's going on around here."
Full Story ›|Email & Share Options ›|Comment › |Print ›
Posted On Wednesday, 05.11.2011 / 2:15 PM

By Brian Hedger -  NHL.com Correspondent /NHL.com - 2011 WCSF: San Jose-Detroit Live Blog

Bad penalties plaguing Abdelkader

It's been a rough series for Red Wings forward Justin Abdelkader, who has taken a number of penalties at inopportune times.

His latest troubling infraction came late in Game 6 on Tuesday with the Red Wings clinging to a 2-1 lead and needing the win to push the series to Game 7. He was called for holding and put Detroit's penalty kill units plus goalie Jimmy Howard in a sticky situation.

Detroit killed it off, but it was a long 2:00 in the penalty box for Abdelkader.

"I'm still thinking about it," he said on Wednesday morning, before boarding the team plane. "You don't want your team shorthanded when you're up like that in the third period. You think about it and hopefully learn from it and won't do it again. It's not a fun feeling, I'll tell you that much. It's just a long two minutes."

Red Wings coach Mike Babcock said he had another chat about committing penalties at bad times – the second such conversation the two have had in this series.

"I just told him, two games in a row now, 'You've got to decide … are you going to be one of those guys that their whole career takes a bad penalty at the wrong time or are you going to look after it?'" Babcock said. "He's a great kid and a great teammate and he's going to get it looked after."
Full Story ›|Email & Share Options ›|Comment › |Print ›
Posted On Tuesday, 05.10.2011 / 4:38 PM

By Brian Hedger -  NHL.com Correspondent /NHL.com - 2011 WCSF: San Jose-Detroit Live Blog

Babcock further explains his 'drivetrain' analogy for Datsyuk

It was the perfect symbolism for the coach of the Motor City's hockey team to make.

Babcock was asked after Game 5, a 4-3 win by the Red Wings, what allowed Detroit center Pavel Datsyuk able to overcome a rumored wrist injury to dish out three impressive assists at crucial moments in the game. In short, Babcock said player like Datsyuk have a "drivetrain" that other players don't always have, which allows them to turn it up a notch in the playoffs.

Babcock was asked to expand on that analogy after Tuesday's morning skate and said that "drivetrain" can be installed, so to speak, by hard work and determination.

"I think for sure it can be taught," Babcock said. "When you come to a team like the Detroit Red Wings, when you arrive, Steve Yzerman's like that or Nick Lidstrom's like that. Pavel Datsyuk is an absolute workaholic on and off the ice. It's not by accident that these guys are this good. It's because they work that hard."

Babcock then cited how hard Datsyuk works on and off the ice to keep his 32-year old body in shape and to keep honing his already jaw-dropping array of skills at both ends of the ice.

"To me, that's what separates him," Babcock said. "There's lots of nice players in the league, but they don't get to play long at the end of the year, because it's not about being a nice player. It's about winning your battle every time you're on the ice. There's no space and there's no room and the ice gets worse as the year goes on, so it's not about being pretty and it's not about open ice, or about who looks good in practice with no pressure on him. It's who can make a play in a small area and win a battle. To me, that's the game."
Full Story ›|Email & Share Options ›|Comment › |Print ›
Posted On Tuesday, 05.10.2011 / 4:26 PM

By Brian Hedger -  NHL.com Correspondent /NHL.com - 2011 WCSF: San Jose-Detroit Live Blog

Red Wings not acknowledging Datsyuk injury

It's already one of the worst-kept secrets in sports and is starting to border on comical. Multiple reports say that Detroit star center Pavel Datsyuk has a hand or wrist injury that is preventing him from taking faceoffs.

Datsyuk was even termed "questionable" before Game 5 in San Jose on the Versus pre-game broadcast before recording three assists in the Red Wings' impressive come-from-behind 4-3 win to extend the series to Tuesday night's Game 6 at Joe Louis Arena.

Detroit coach Mike Babcock was asked if Datsyuk's wrist was the reason he didn't take any faceoffs in Game 5, and Babcock tried to deflect attention from it by sheepishly stating that Datsyuk wasn't very good at draws before stating the truth: "He's our best faceoff guy."

Then Datsyuk denied he was even injured at all when the Wings returned from San Jose on Monday.

"What wrist?" Datsyuk said, when asked how his wrist was holding up. "I'm ok."

Why no faceoffs in Game 5 then?

"I'm not good at faceoffs," Datsyuk deadpanned.

The subterfuge continued on Tuesday after the Red Wings' morning skate. First up was veteran forward Tomas Holmstrom, who was asked about Datsyuk's health.

"Everybody's fresh, fresh like a daisy," said Holmstrom, who scored the game-winner in game 5 by deflecting a blast by Nicklas Lidstrom. "There's no problems."

Next up was Babcock, who was again asked about Detroit's strategy to deal with Datsyuk being unable to take faceoffs because of the wrist.

"Pav's OK," Babcock said. "There's these rumors going around that he's hurt, be he looks good to me."

He looks good to Holmstrom, too.

"I've played with him a long time," Holmstrom said. "You think you've seen it all, then he takes it up another notch."
Full Story ›|Email & Share Options ›|Comment › |Print ›
Posted On Tuesday, 05.10.2011 / 4:12 PM

By Brian Hedger -  NHL.com Correspondent /NHL.com - 2011 WCSF: San Jose-Detroit Live Blog

Kronwall has no ill will toward Clowe

When word began to spread on Tuesday morning that Sharks forward Ryane Clowe didn't make the trip to Detroit after Game 5 in San Jose, most immediately thought it had something to do with a huge that Detroit's Niklas Kronvall put on him.

It was a clean hit, as Kronwall circled in toward Clowe near the boards and sent him to the ice while he tried to play the puck. San Jose coach Todd McLellan said Clowe stayed behind with an undisclosed upper-body injury not related to the hit, while Kronwall said he wasn't trying to knock Clowe out of action.

"Obviously, you don't want anyone to get hurt," Kronwall said on Tuesday, after Detroit's morning skate. "They said it was flu-like symptoms. I don't think it has anything to do with that hit whatsoever."

He also quickly forgot about the hit after delivering it, seeing as Detroit trailed at the time.

"I don't think anything too much after a hit," Kronwall said. "You just go out there and try to play physical."

Kronwall also laid out Dany Heatley in Game 4 with a big hit in Game 4 at Joe Louis Arena, which Clowe appeared to take issue with at the end of the game. After the final horn sounded on Detroit's 4-3 win, Clowe got into a small scuffle near the Detroit bench with Justin Abdelkader.

Asked about it afterward, Clowe said he wished it had been Kronwall he'd run into at that point. Kronwal, however, had nothing but praise for Clowe's ability -- especially after racking up 4 assists in the past two games of this series.

"He's an honest player, works hard, plays hard," Kronwall said. "He's a good player."
Full Story ›|Email & Share Options ›|Comment › |Print ›
Posted On Tuesday, 05.10.2011 / 4:00 PM

By Brian Hedger -  NHL.com Correspondent /NHL.com - 2011 WCSF: San Jose-Detroit Live Blog

Babcock wants more grind, less finesse, from Modano

Perhaps offering a clue into his logic of not playing star veteran forward Mike Modano for the first five games of this series, Detroit coach Mike Babcock said he wants the 40-year old Modano to play a simple game and grind out wins in puck battles.

Snazzy plays are not what interests Babcock – who is playing Modano in place of the injured Johan Franzen (ankle).

"He's got to skate, he's got to compete," Babcock said of Modano, who grew up in nearby Westland, Mich.,but played the first 20 years of his 21-year NHL career with the Dallas Stars organization. "It's racing out there. There's mistakes being made defensively by both teams that you don't see during the year, because the pace is so high. There's no room. If you think you're going to go out there and make a nice play, it's not going to happen. You've got to go out there and grind and compete and work hard. If you do that, the offense is going to come off the cycle, not off the rush. We've got to find a way to get him involved in that."
Full Story ›|Email & Share Options ›|Comment › |Print ›
Posted On Friday, 05.06.2011 / 1:00 PM

By Brian Hedger -  NHL.com Correspondent /NHL.com - 2011 WCSF: San Jose-Detroit Live Blog

Red Wings paying high price for high-sticking calls

Detroit has been called for five high-sticking infractions in the first three games and the Sharks have scored power-play goals on two of them. The Sharks also won Game 1 in overtime on Benn Ferriero's goal just 20 seconds after Justin Abdelkader got out of the penalty box for a high-sticking double minor.

A high-sticking minor called on Darren Helm in Game 3 led to the first goal of the game, a power-play goal by Devin Setoguchi.

"We've just got to keep our sticks down," said Henrik Zetterberg, who was called for a high stick in Game 2. "Soon as it's up there, you have a chance to (get penalized) for four minutes or two. It can happen very easily if you have the sticks up high."
Full Story ›|Email & Share Options ›|Comment › |Print ›
Posted On Friday, 05.06.2011 / 12:58 PM

By Brian Hedger -  NHL.com Correspondent /NHL.com - 2011 WCSF: San Jose-Detroit Live Blog

Red Wings curious about faceoff do's and don'ts

There have been a number of players kicked out of the faceoff circle before draws in this series and the Red Wings have taken notice -- especially when it comes to their own players getting the boot.

It especially was noticeable in Game 3 at Joe Louis Arena, when the Sharks won 53 percent of the faceoffs taken.

"It is tough for both teams to know what we're doing right and what we're doing wrong," Henrik Zetterberg said. "One time you get kicked out and next time you're not getting kicked out. It's a fine line there, but we've just got to adjust."

Kris Draper said the best way to deal with the issue is to make sure, if possible, there is more than one center on as many forward lines as possible.

"A lot of guys have been tossed out, probably the most I've seen in a while, in Game 3," Draper said. "It puts an onus on the importance of faceoffs. Both teams want to start with the puck, especially on the (penalty kill). Collectively, as a group, we have to be better."

Full Story ›|Email & Share Options ›|Comment › |Print ›
Posted On Thursday, 05.05.2011 / 4:30 PM

By Brian Hedger -  NHL.com Correspondent /NHL.com - 2011 WCSF: San Jose-Detroit Live Blog

Detroit gaining confidence against Niemi

Sharks goalie Antti Niemi again made some big saves in key situations to keep the Red Wings at bay and give San Jose more time to find a way to win Game 3 in overtime.

Still, it wasn't his sharpest game of the series -- Niemi gave up three goals on 41 shots and allowed more rebounds than he'd given up in the first two games.

"We got to him a little bit (in Game 3) by shooting the puck a little bit more and having guys in front of the net and being there for those second chances," Red Wings captain Nicklas Lidstrom said. "That's something we have to build on."
Full Story ›|Email & Share Options ›|Comment › |Print ›
Posted On Thursday, 05.05.2011 / 4:26 PM

By Brian Hedger -  NHL.com Correspondent /NHL.com - 2011 WCSF: San Jose-Detroit Live Blog

Red Wings scuffling on penalty kill

After the Sharks went 2-for-4 on the power play in Game 3 Wednesday, which led to a 4-3 overtime victory for San Jose, the Red Wings' penalty killing fell to just 73.3 percent (11 of 15).

Both of the Sharks' power-play goals in that game were scored by Devin Setoguchi, who finished with a hat trick and scored the game-winner in overtime at even strength -- shortly after San Jose's penalty-killing units killed off a Detroit power play.

The Red Wings also struggled a bit on the penalty kill in their first-round sweep of the Phoenix Coyotes. What's going on that's leading to this dip in effectiveness?

"They're just finding ways to get pucks on net and they're moving the puck really well," Detroit goalie Jimmy Howard said of the Sharks' power play Thursday. "I think we just need to stay in our spots, basically. Make them work the puck around the outside and not really give them anything in tight."

However, even that didn't work on the second of Setoguchi's power-play goals. Setoguchi was ready to blast a one-timer from the left circle when he shattered his stick on the shot and the puck slowly slid through traffic and into the net -- with Howard unable to get back after lunging to the left post in anticipation of the blast.

"What do you do, as a goalie, in that situation?" said Howard, who didn't even bother to look at replays of it. "He seemed just cocked and ready to let a bomb go, so that was the last thing in my mind that was going to happen. Pass came over. It was right in his wheel house and I rushed over strong expecting that one-timer. You've just got to keep going and concentrate on making the next save. Bounces happen."

Full Story ›|Email & Share Options ›|Comment › |Print ›
First | Prev | 55 | 56 | 57 | 58 | 59 | 60 | Next | Last
Quote of the Day

I remember the first time at Wrigley Field all of us had the long johns, the turtlenecks and the extra equipment because we were afraid of being cold. Halfway through the first period everybody's ripping everything off and we just ended up wearing what we would normally wear for a game at the United Center.

— Chicago Blackhawks forward Patrick Sharp on the 2009 Bridgestone NHL Winter Classic