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Randy's Thought of the Day - 11/6/2013

by Randy Hahn / San Jose Sharks

If you watched Tuesday nights broadcast of the Sharks game against Buffalo on Comcast Sportsnet California or saw the highlights later on you know that the Sharks got a raw deal in overtime. The problem is I’m still not sure how a winning goal in overtime went undetected by the on-ice officials and the video review officials. Here’s what I think happened.

About two minutes into overtime, with the score tied 4-4, the Sharks Tyler Kennedy fired a hard wrist shot past Sabres goalie Ryan Miller and it bounced off the far goal post. Referee Mike Leggo immediately and correctly waved his arms indicating no goal, but he did not blow his whistle nor did it seem he was about to. The puck then bounced back underneath Miller back into the crease. Then a diving Tommy Wingels poked it into the net. The overhead replay then clearly shows Buffalo defenseman Tyler Myers quickly kicking the puck back out of the net with his right skate and the puck was then frozen underneath Millers pad. Leggo then blew the play dead.

It seems to me that Mike Leggo never saw the puck enter the net and didn’t see Meyers quickly slide it back out with his foot/skate. I’m guessing that in Leggo’s mind there was nothing to review because he never saw a goal. Now of course, we know that there was a goal.

The next question is what happened to the video review process? As I understand it the video goal judge at SAP Center has a dedicated live feed of both the overhead goal camera and the NHL’s in-net camera. Both of those views clearly showed the puck entering the net. It is also my understanding that the NHL’s video control center in Toronto has exactly the same live feed of those two camera’s. But neither the in-arena video goal judge, nor the staff manning the NHL video control center noticed the puck going into the net. Once the ensuing faceoff occurred and overtime continued, no goal could be awarded.

A few moments later our Comcast crew, in reviewing the play, noticed the puck had crossed the line and then we aired our footage at the next stoppage of play.

In summary: The Sharks scored in overtime, the on ice officials didn’t see it and the in arena video goal judge didn’t see it on the live feeds, nor did his colleagues in Toronto. The NHL’s usually reliable process failed this time. It cost the Sharks a win and a point in the standings and I’m not sure how the hockey gods will even this one out.

I’m Randy Hahn

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