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Dallas Stars 0, Anaheim Ducks 4 FINAL

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ANAHEIM, Calif. (AP) -- The frustrated Dallas Stars held a closed-door meeting for more than 20 minutes after Anaheim's backup goalie Martin Gerber shut the door on them.

Gerber made 32 saves for his third career shutout and the Mighty Ducks got power-play goals 22 seconds apart from Vaclav Prospal and Joffrey Lupul in the second period to ignite a 4-0 victory over their Pacific Division rivals on Sunday night.

Defenseman Kurt Sauer ended a 33-game goal drought and Sergei Fedorov added a short-handed goal in the third period to help the defending Western Conference champions snap a three-game losing streak and hand Dallas its fourth straight loss.

"If you play long enough, you've been through these a number of times," Dallas captain Mike Modano said of the meeting. "I think everybody just wanted to let their feelings be known. Everybody cares about this situation. If we didn't, we would be on the bus already."

The Stars are 4-10-2 in their last 16 games. They have been shut out in two of their last three, and six times all together -- twice as many as last season, when they had the NHL's second-best record and won their sixth division title in seven years.

"We've been lucky and fortunate to have had a very successful team for a while, and this had been a major shot to the ego lately," Modano said. "Nothing is really clicking -- playmaking, puckhandling or passing. You can Monday-morning-quarterback this thing to death, but we have to refind ourselves and establish our team. We need a lot more commitment and discipline."

It was Dallas' first visit to Anaheim since May 5, when the Ducks wrapped up their conference semifinal series in six games on a goal by Sandis Ozolinsh with 66 seconds left in regulation.

Gerber got the nod instead of playoff MVP Jean-Sebastien Giguere, who was lifted during each of Anaheim's previous two games after giving up four goals at Detroit -- and five more in Atlanta. Giguere is 0-4-1 with a 3.85 goals-against average and an .884 save percentage in his last five starts.

"You never blame one guy. It happens to the whole team. So the team has to carry the burden," Gerber said. "The only thing we have to focus on is to go to the playoffs. It doesn't matter who plays how many minutes or how many games."

Making his 10th start of the season, Gerber made a miraculous sprawling stop on Pierre Turgeon's scoring bid to preserve the shutout after the losing his stick midway through the third period.

Dallas goalie Marty Turco, who had the league's lowest goals-against average in 2002-03, made 15 of his 33 saves in the first period before the Ducks' power play capitalized twice on staggered penalties against Gavin Morgan and John Erskine.

Niclas Havelid's 50-foot slap shot was wide of the left post, but Prospal played the hard carom off the boards and tucked his sixth goal behind Turco with 58 seconds left on Morgan's roughing infraction.

Lupul, who scored both of Anaheim's goals Friday night in a loss in Atlanta, connected with 1:04 left on Erskine's elbowing penalty, beating Turco to the stick side with a wrist shot from the left circle at 4:47 of the second.

Anaheim was 0-for-16 with the man advantage over its previous five games, and Dallas had allowed one goal in 24 short-handed situations in its previous eight contests.

"Obviously, that was a huge turning point in this game," Anaheim captain Steve Rucchin said. "It definitely helped, to get ahead by two goals that quick in a tight game."

The Ducks, who thwarted all seven Dallas power plays, made it 3-0 just 25 seconds after killing off Samuel Pahlsson's hooking penalty.

Samuel Pahlsson did an amazing job of maintaining possession of the puck behind the Dallas net with the equally tenacious Rob DiMaio hanging all over him -- and it paid off when Sauer took Pahlsson's pass in the slot and scored on a 25-foot wrist shot. It was Sauer's second goal in 102 NHL games and his first since March 9, against Detroit's Curtis Joseph in Anaheim.

"He was doing a great job protecting the puck," Sauer said. "I don't know how many times he went back and forth."

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