Welcome |Account|Sign Out 
NEW! SIGN IN WITH YOUR SOCIAL PROFILE
OR
Username or EmailPassword
 
2014 NHL Draft
SHARE
Go Figure

Assist
An assist is awarded to the player or players (maximum of two) who touched the puck prior to the goal, provided no defender plays or possesses the puck in between.

Game Played
A player receives credit for playing in a game if i) he steps on the ice during time played or; ii) serves any penalty.

Game-Winning Goal
After the final score has been determined, the goal which leaves the winning Club one goal ahead of its opponent is the game-winning goal (example: if Team A beats Team B 8-3, the player scoring the fourth goal for Team A receives credit for the game-winning goal).

Game-Tying Goal
The final goal in a tie game.

Goal
A goal is awarded to the last player on the scoring Club to touch the puck prior to the puck entering the net.

Goals-Against Average
Multiply goals allowed (GA) by 60 and divide by minutes played (MIN).

Goaltender
A goaltender receives a win, tie or loss if he is on the ice when either the game-winning or game-tying goal is scored.

Penalty-Killing Percentage
Subtract total number of power-play goals allowed from total number of shorthanded situations to get total number of power-plays killed. Divide the total number of power-plays killed by the total number of shorthanded situations.

Playoff Format

The Stanley Cup Playoffs consists of 16 teams, eight from each conference. The top three teams in each division make up the first 12 teams in the playoffs. The remaining four spots are filled by the next two highest-placed finishers in each conference -- regardless of division -- based on regular-season points. It is possible for one division to send five teams to the postseason while the other sends three.

The seeding of the wild-card teams within each divisional playoffis  determined by regular-season points. The division winner with the most points in the conference is matched against the wild-card team with the fewest points; the division winner with the second-most points in the conference plays the wild-card team with the second-fewest points. The teams finishing second and third in each division play in the first round of the playoffs. The winners of each series play for berths in the conference championship series. The winners of the conference championships advance to the Stanley Cup Final.

Home-ice advantage for the Stanley Cup Finals is determined by points.

All series are best-of-seven.

Playoff Tie-Breaking Formula
If two or more clubs are tied in points during the regular season, the standing of the clubs is determined in the following order:
1) The fewer number of games played (i.e., superior points percentage).
2) The greater number of games won, excluding games won in the Shootout. This figure is reflected in the ROW column.
3) The greater number of points earned in games between the tied clubs. If two clubs are tied, and have not played an equal number of home games against each other, points earned in the first game played in the city that had the extra game shall not be included. If more than two clubs are tied, the higher percentage of available points earned in games among those clubs, and not including any "odd" games, shall be used to determine the standing.
4) The greater differential between goals for and against for the entire regular season. NOTE: In standings a victory in a shootout counts as one goal for, while a shootout loss counts as one goal against.

Plus-Minus
A player is awarded a "plus" each time he is on the ice when his Club scores an even-strength or shorthanded goal. He receives a "minus" if he is on the ice for an even-strength or shorthanded goal scored by the opposing Club. The difference in these numbers is considered the player's "plus-minus" statistic.

Power-Play Goal
A goal scored by a Club while it has a manpower advantage due to an opponent's penalty. Following are some examples of what is and is not considered a power-play goal:
  • if a Club has an advantage on a minor penalty starting at 2:02 of the period and it scores at 4:02, the goal is not a power-play goal.
  • if a Club scores on a delayed penalty, the goal is not a power-play goal.
  • if a Club has an advantage due to a five-minute major or match penalty, that Club is always credited with having one more advantage than the number of power-play goals it scores during that advantage, because the penalty does not expire. A new advantage begins after each power-play goal. For example, if Team A scores three goals during a major penalty, it is credited with four advantages.
  • if a Club is on a power-play for any length of time, it is considered to have had an advantage.
  • if a minor penalty is incurred by a Club on a power-play due to a major penalty, a new advantage is given to that Club when its minor penalty expires, provided the opponent's major penalty is still in effect.

Power Play Percentage
Total number of power-play goals divided by total number of power-play opportunities.

Save Percentage
Subtract goals allowed (GA) from shots against (SA) to determine saves. Then divide saves by shots against.

Shooting Percentage
Divide the number of goals scored by the number of shots taken.

Shorthanded Goal
A goal scored by a Club while it is at a manpower disadvantage. The same cases apply for shorthand as for power-play goals, but in the opposite manner.

Shot on Goal
If a player shoots the puck with the intention of scoring and if that shot would have gone in the net had the goaltender not stopped it, the shot is recorded as a "shot on goal".

Shutout
If two goaltenders combine for a shutout, neither receives credit for the shutout. Instead it is recorded as a Club shutout.

Tenths of a Second
If a penalty or goal occurs in the last minute, the time is rounded off to the previous second (eg: if a penalty is called with 12.4 seconds left in a period, the time is indicated as 19:47 and not 19:48.)

Quote of the Day

What we expected is what we got. Very mature young individual that's focused. He is on the right track. He's not only a great hockey individual, but he's a good person off the ice. He seemed to take a leadership role with this group right off the hop and ran away with it, and was vocal, was respectful, was everything it takes to be a Panther. His future looks bright.

— Florida Panthers director of player development Brian Skrudland on defenseman Aaron Ekblad's performance at development camp