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(Page 157 of 264)
NHL Insider

Niedermayer discusses a career success on "NHL Hour"

Thursday, 12.15.2011 / 7:36 PM / NHL Insider

NHL.com

Success followed Scott Niedermayer throughout his hockey career -- including, but hardly limited to, the four Stanley Cups he won as a member of the New Jersey Devils and Anaheim Ducks.

Niedermayer won every major North American and international hockey championship out there, beginning with a gold medal for Team Canada at the World Junior Championship in 1991 and including the Memorial Cup with Kamloops a year later, an IIHF World Championship as well as the World Cup of Hockey in 2004 and Olympic gold for Canada in 2002 and 2010.

On the eve of having his No. 27 retired by the Devils, the smooth-skating defenseman appeared on Thursday's "NHL Hour With Commissioner Gary Bettman" to talk about that unprecedented achievement.
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Flames GM Feaster makes return to Tampa

Thursday, 12.15.2011 / 7:25 PM / NHL Insider

Lonnie Herman - NHL.com Correspondent

TAMPA -- Jay Feaster, the architect of the Stanley Cup winning Tampa Bay Lightning of 2004, returned to the scene of his – and the Lightning's – greatest triumph on Thursday. It was Feaster's first trip to the St. Pete Times Forum since becoming the general manager of the Calgary Flames a year ago.

Feaster took the reigns as the general manger of the Lightning in 2002 and led the Lightning to the franchise's only championship two years later. He resigned in 2008 with three years remaining on his contract, citing difficulties co-existing with then-Lightning owners Len Barrie and Oren Koules.

"What the people inside the organization went through in those two years, I don't wish that on my worst enemy," Feaster said. "That was, for me, the toughest part; to see what it did to the people."

The current ownership and management, however, drew raves from Feaster.
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Selanne blazed a trail from Finland to Winnipeg

Thursday, 12.15.2011 / 9:00 AM / NHL Insider

Risto Pakarinen - NHL.com Correspondent

What had seemed impossible just a few months earlier had become possible, thanks to a baby-faced Finnish kid.

He received a long pass at the red line and took three quick steps that gave him the edge over the defenseman, and then there was just the goalie to beat.

The kid accelerated some more, then waited, moved the puck to his backhand and lifted it to the back of the net. Exhilarated, he turned toward his teammates that were following the play, threw his glove up in the air, and using his stick as a fake rifle, shot it down just before disappearing in the team huddle. 
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Little coming up big for Jets

Wednesday, 12.14.2011 / 6:29 PM / NHL Insider

Patrick Williams - NHL.com Correspondent

WINNIPEG -- A month ago, Bryan Little of the Winnipeg Jets admits that he may have flubbed the type of setup that led to his game-winning goal in Tuesday night's 2-1 win over the Minnesota Wild.

Dustin Byfuglien lasered a pass across the slot from the right side to Little at the left post that landed in the center's skates. With Minnesota goaltender Nicklas Backstrom scrambling to push across his crease to the right, Little calmly kicked the puck to his stick and tapped the puck past Backstrom.

"It's amazing," Little said of what an upgrade in confidence can do. "[A month ago] maybe I kick [the puck] too hard out of my skates or something. I handled it more calmly than maybe I would have earlier in the season. When you have that confidence to shoot the puck without even thinking, it's amazing how much it can do for you."
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Weber once again proving Norris-worthy for Predators

Wednesday, 12.14.2011 / 5:00 PM / NHL Insider

John Manasso - NHL.com Correspondent

NASHVILLE -- As Anaheim Ducks forward Bobby Ryan stepped out of the penalty box last Saturday, the puck bounded out of his team's defensive zone and toward the other end, creating a potentially dangerous situation.

Ryan, a three-time 30-goal scorer who famously undressed a couple of Nashville Predators during the playoffs last season, seemed to have a step on the only defender giving chase.

Never fear – that defender was Predators captain Shea Weber. Even at the end of a long power-play shift, Weber caught up to Ryan and played the body, delivering an enormous left shoulder with the full weight of his 6-foot-4, 232-pound frame to Ryan, and the play drifted harmlessly into the corner.

Earlier that morning, Ryan was asked what he might have learned about playing against Weber in the 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs that he had not already known. His words proved prophetic.

"I think he's a lot faster than I had originally thought," Ryan said. "I always knew he was a little deceptive with it, but we got in a couple of foot races where I thought I had a step or two and he's so explosive. He's got those two or three strides that get him going and he shuts down your time and space well, but other than that he's a straightforward player.
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So how is the new coach doing?

Wednesday, 12.14.2011 / 1:48 PM / NHL Insider

Dan Rosen - NHL.com Senior Writer

Five teams have changed coaches this season, and it's not even Christmas yet.

It started Nov. 6, when Ken Hitchcock replaced Davis Payne in St. Louis. Twenty-four days later, Bruce Boudreau (Washington) and Paul Maurice (Carolina) lost their jobs and were replaced by Dale Hunter and Kirk Muller, respectively. Less than 72 hours later, Boudreau was hired as Randy Carlyle's replacement in Anaheim.

And earlier this week the Los Angeles Kings fired Terry Murray and have, at least for the time being, replaced him on an interim basis with John Stevens, who was on staff as an assistant.
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Boudreau still getting used to new life on West Coast

Wednesday, 12.14.2011 / 1:41 PM / NHL Insider

Dan Rosen - NHL.com Senior Writer

Bruce Boudreau uses two words to describe his transition to Anaheim over the past two weeks.

"Settling in," he told NHL.com during a 15-minute phone interview Tuesday.

Boudreau figures he will be doing exactly that for a while as he adjusts to life on an unfamiliar coast, in a different conference, away from his family and the comfort zone he called home for four years as the successful coach of the Washington Capitals.

Wednesday's game against Phoenix at Honda Center will be Boudreau's sixth behind the Ducks' bench. He's won only one of his first five (1-3-1), a record that's making his transition from the Capitals to the Ducks even more challenging than it was going to be for a coach coming to a last-place team less than three days after he lost what was, for all intents and purposes, his dream job.

"I would have loved to come in here and won the first five games, and quite frankly a bounce here and a bounce there, we should have won four out of five minimum," said Boudreau, who won 202 games and four Southeast Division titles as the coach in Washington. "But the work ethic is there and the belief that we're going to win games is there."
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Selanne looking forward to Winnipeg return

Wednesday, 12.14.2011 / 10:51 AM / NHL Insider

Curtis Zupke - NHL.com Correspondent

Whenever Teemu Selanne is on the road, he sees his past.

Sometimes he spots it from the team bus as it dips into the tunnel. Sometimes it walks right up to him as he makes the walk through the hotel lobby up to his room after the morning skate.

Other times he'll catch a glimpse of it during pre-game warm-ups, that quaint, retro-blue jersey staring back at him in the stands.

He doesn't have to look to see what's on the back of it."
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Tkachuk fortunate to have been Selanne's teammate

Wednesday, 12.14.2011 / 10:31 AM / NHL Insider

Brian Hedger - NHL.com Correspondent

It's one of those memories that always will make Keith Tkachuk shake his head in disbelief.

Tkachuk, who retired in 2010 and was inducted into the U.S. Hockey Hall of Fame on Monday in Chicago, was just 20 years old and playing his first full season with the original version of the Winnipeg Jets when Teemu Selanne, a 22-year old Jets rookie, scored a jaw-dropping 76 goals.

That mark shattered Mike Bossy's old NHL rookie scoring record of 54 goals and remains a record today. Selanne also added 56 assists that season, and his 132 points also remains a League record for first-year players. 
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A more dedicated Kane prepares for his closeup

Wednesday, 12.14.2011 / 1:00 AM / NHL Insider

Brian Hedger - NHL.com Correspondent

CHICAGO -- Patrick Sharp still has to remind himself sometimes that Patrick Kane is no longer the baby-faced prospect who burst onto the scene straight out of the junior ranks.

It's already been four-plus seasons since Kane scored 21 goals and added 51 assists for an impressive 72-point season in 2007-08 after the Chicago Blackhawks selected him No.1 overall in the 2007 NHL Draft.

Since then, the now 23-year old Kane has come much further in his career path. He's scored more than 20 goals and 70 points in each of his first four seasons, has eight goals and 23 assists in 30 games this year and also scored that memorable overtime goal in Game 6 of the 2010 Stanley Cup Final in Philadelphia to clinch the Hawks' first championship in 49 years.

"I always think of Kaner as that rookie and that first-year player that burst onto the scene and was so explosive and exciting," Sharp said. "It's hard to believe he's played four years in between then until now."
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