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Stanley Cup Final
(Page 152 of 298)
NHL Insider

Diet, training regimen have Subban in peak condition

Monday, 08.27.2012 / 3:00 AM / NHL Insider

Dan Rosen - NHL.com Senior Writer

TORONTO -- Montreal defenseman P.K. Subban reads off his breakfast menu without a single change in his facial expression. For him, barbecuing a steak at 7 a.m. and pairing it with freshly blended vegetable juice, fish oils, Vitamin C and various other multi-vitamins is absolutely normal.

Patrick Holland
DEFENSEMAN  - MTL
Goals: 7 | Assists: 29 | Pts: 36
Shots: 205 | +/-: 9

No eggs. No toast. No potatoes.

"I eat a lot of protein -- steak in the morning, steak in the afternoon, fish, chicken," Subban told NHL.com during a recent trip to his training facility. "At the start of the summer I order a whole cow from a grain-fed farm. I have it at my parents' house and my mom will season [the butchered meat], and I'll pick them up to have steaks for the week."

Jokes aside, Subban actually does eat the whole cow he orders each summer.

It's all part of a nutrition plan designed for him by his personal trainer, Clance Laylor, who has eliminated all grain, wheat and dairy products from Subban's summer diet.

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Slap shot the weapon of hockey's hardest shooters

Sunday, 08.26.2012 / 3:00 AM / NHL Insider

John Kreiser - NHL.com Columnist

From the early days of hockey until the late 1950s and early '60s, coaches frowned on the slap shot -- it took too long to get off, they said. The big windup let the goaltender get set. It missed the net too often.

Fast-forward to the present era and it's impossible to imagine hockey without the slap shot. It has become a lethal weapon and changed the way the game is played, forcing goaltenders to don masks and compelling teams to adopt strategies to keep big shooters from getting the chance to blast away.

Players are bigger and stronger now, and composite sticks have all but replaced the "twigs" of old, making it difficult to compare shooters of different generations. Today's shooters can be clocked on speed guns in a way that those of previous generations could not be.

But the anticipation in the stands when a player tees up a slapper -- the knowledge that the game could change in an instant -- is every bit as prevalent today as it was decades ago.

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Carter's day with Stanley Cup typically low-key

Friday, 08.24.2012 / 7:26 PM / NHL Insider

Dave Lozo - NHL.com Staff Writer

LONDON, Ontario -- Quiet, reserved and private are three words that aptly describe Jeff Carter, so it was fitting that they summarized his day with the Stanley Cup just as appropriately.

Jeff Carter raises the Stanley Cup in London, Ontario, while wearing his childhood hockey jersey. (Photo: Hockey Hall of Fa)

Surrounded by friends, teammates from his junior days with the Sault Ste. Marie Greyhounds, along with immediate and extended family in his parents' back yard, Carter reaped the benefits of his first championship with the Los Angeles Kings just two years after falling two games short as a member of the Philadelphia Flyers.

The shock and sadness Carter felt after his trade from Philadelphia to the Columbus Blue Jackets 14 months ago was something he and his family talked about Friday, but everyone acknowledged that the situation couldn't have unfolded any better for the 27-year-old.

"This is what it's all about," Carter said. "You look back on it now, and obviously at the time, it was tough to take. I loved where we were at and I never wanted to leave. But we're sitting here today with the Stanley Cup, so it's pretty unbelievable."

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Panthers' Dineen looking to stay the course

Friday, 08.24.2012 / 12:57 PM / NHL Insider

Tal Pinchevsky - NHL.com Staff Writer

"We've got a number of real quality prospects. Historically, I've been in organizations with Anaheim and Buffalo where the road to the NHL goes through the American League. I don't think that's an unhealthy thing. I think players go down there and learn how to be professionals and how to grow as players and people." -- Kevin Dineen

Kevin Dineen's first season as an NHL coach started with a lot more questions than answers. It ended with his Florida Panthers winning the Southeast Division crown and their first postseason appearance in a decade.

Dineen doesn't plan on taking a step back in 2012-13.

When the longtime NHL player was named Florida's coach last summer, Dineen inherited a Panthers' team that had been remade by general manager Dale Tallon. In acquiring 10 new players over the summer, Tallon turned over half the roster of a franchise that had gone an NHL-record 10 straight seasons without making the playoffs.

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Top all-time speed demons have changed face of NHL

Friday, 08.24.2012 / 9:00 AM / NHL Insider

John Kreiser - NHL.com Columnist

Few things in any sport are as exciting as watching an elite skater blaze past an opponent, leaving him looking like he's standing still. End-to-end rushes and breakaways are the types of plays that bring fans out of their seats.

The speed of an NHL game has never been faster, as teams put more and more emphasis on skating. But not every great player is a great skater -- Wayne Gretzky, for one, admitted he wasn't all that fast -- and there are players who can fly but aren't as skilled in the other aspects of the game.

Still, there's no getting around the importance of speed. With that in mind, here's a look at seven of the fastest skaters in NHL history:

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Doughty's day with Cup honors grandparents

Thursday, 08.23.2012 / 6:49 PM / NHL Insider

Dave Lozo - NHL.com Staff Writer

LONDON, Ontario -- Drew Doughty's grandfather, Edward, was the first family member to pull up to his driveway Thursday morning. The 74-year-old didn't show up empty-handed, either. He carried with him a clear, homemade jug of white wine with a Guelph Storm logo painted on the side of it, "holy water" for hockey's holy grail, he called it.

Drew Doughty
Defense - LAK
GOALS: 10 | ASST: 26 | PTS: 36
SOG: 168 | +/-: -2

"He was lucky to win and lucky to be here," Edward said, before playfully poking fun at his advanced age. "I feel pretty lucky to be here too."

It was a special day for Doughty, the Los Angeles Kings' 22-year-old defenseman who had his day with the Stanley Cup two months after his team won hockey's biggest prize for the first time in franchise history. But long before Doughty paraded the Cup through his hometown, long before his brilliant goal in Game 2 of the Final against the New Jersey Devils, and long before he was drafted by the Kings in 2008 after a stellar career at Guelph, he was relying on extended and adopted family to get his career started.

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After eventful summer, Keenan hopes for NHL return

Thursday, 08.23.2012 / 5:06 PM / NHL Insider

Tal Pinchevsky - NHL.com Staff Writer

It has been more than three years since Mike Keenan last served as coach of an NHL team. His up-and-down run involving eight teams over 25 years ended in 2009, when he led the Calgary Flames to their last Stanley Cup Playoff appearance.

But after an eventful summer, the man known as "Iron Mike" is still hoping for another shot in the NHL.

For Keenan, things picked up markedly in April, when he was announced as the new coach of the Canadian hockey team for the 2013 Maccabiah Games, an international sporting event in Israel in which thousands of Jewish athletes representing dozens of countries compete in more than 30 sports. For Keenan, whose ex-wife is Jewish and whose daughter was raised in the faith, it was a unique opportunity.

"I have a real sense of the faith and the people. My mother-in-law escaped Auschwitz [concentration camp] and I went to Auschwitz in 1972 and had conversations with her after that," Keenan told NHL.com. "My involvement is deeper than hockey. That's a large reason why I wanted to get involved."

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Tortorella sees Nash as good fit with Rangers

Friday, 08.17.2012 / 9:02 AM / NHL Insider

NHL.com

Rick Nash
Left Wing - NYR
GOALS: 30 | ASST: 29 | PTS: 59
SOG: 306 | +/-: -19
John Tortorella has yet to speak to Rick Nash in person, but the New York Rangers coach likes what he's heard.

"The thing I like about Nash -- and I haven't even met him face to face -- in one conversation with him, he's all business," Tortorella told the website Blueshirts United on Thursday. "Everyone I have talked to about him says he's not a real high-maintenance guy -- [he] wants to play hard, wants to play every day and practice every day. I think we have him at a really good time in his career, and I think he's going to fit in with us tremendously."

Tortorella, known for his no-nonsense approach and the competitive nature of his teams, is confident Nash will fit in despite never winning a Stanley Cup Playoff game -- the Blue Jackets made the postseason just once in his nine seasons with Columbus.

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Lundqvist played 'toughest period' in Sweden

Thursday, 08.16.2012 / 6:03 PM / NHL Insider

NHL.com

Henrik Lundqvist played in two Game 7s and lost an elimination game in overtime during last season's Stanley Cup Playoffs. But the New York Rangers goaltender said the most difficult period he played was in a preseason game in his native Sweden last season.

"That first period was probably the toughest period I ever played," Lundqvist said Wednesday in an interview with Blueshirts United. "I was just thinking about all the years I played there."

The Rangers defeated Frolunda, Lundqvist's former club, 4-2 on Sept. 30 in Gothenburg as part of the NHL Premiere Challenge.

Lundqvist played in Frolunda from 1998 through 2005.

"You know, growing up, that was the club I wanted to play for," Lundqvist said. "It was my dream to play there, I won two championships there. And so many people helped me there, too, to reach my next level.

"And obviously, to have my brother there and my family there, it was a great moment in my career."

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Hartsburg hopes to create new identity in Columbus

Thursday, 08.16.2012 / 5:06 PM / NHL Insider

Tal Pinchevsky - NHL.com Staff Writer

It's been an interesting summer for Craig Hartsburg. Following a disappointing lone season as associate coach in Calgary, the longtime player and coach was scooped up by the Columbus Blue Jackets and given arguably the most challenging mission of his career -- establish a new identity for a last-place team that just traded its only All Star. And he can't wait to get started.

A former head coach in Chicago, Anaheim, and Ottawa, Hartsburg was released in June after the Flames hired Bob Hartley to take over the team. Barely two weeks later, the Blue Jackets hired him to round out the staff of Todd Richards, who was officially named the team's head coach in May after taking over on an interim basis last January. On the heels of one of the most eventful offseasons in franchise history, Hartsburg is looking forward to rebuilding the Jackets.

"It will be an interesting challenge. I'm really excited about helping Columbus build a strong identity and culture that we can have for a number of years," Hartsburg told NHL.com. "We know we're a team that has changed over the last two, three months. It's exciting that we can start to build something and put our stamp on it as coaches."

While Blue Jackets general manager Scott Howson made a number of roster changes over the summer, the biggest without a doubt was the July trade of franchise cornerstone Rick Nash to the Rangers. With the face of the Blue Jackets now gone, the job of establishing a brand new identity for the team falls squarely on Richards and Hartsburg.

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Quote of the Day

I'm here to develop a winning culture and a winning team. There is a bright future ahead of this team.  A lot of young, great hockey players here and on the way … a fan base that's passionate about the game of hockey.

— Dan Bylsma after being introduced as new coach of the Buffalo Sabres