Welcome |Account|Sign Out 
NEW! SIGN IN WITH YOUR SOCIAL PROFILE
OR
Username or EmailPassword
 
2014 NHL Draft
SHARE
(Page 21 of 25)
2011 Stanley Cup Final - Canucks v Bruins

Bergeron talks about Burrows' scrum tactics

Thursday, 06.02.2011 / 12:45 AM / 2011 Stanley Cup Final - Canucks v Bruins

Corey Masisak - NHL.com Staff Writer

VANCOUVER -- Patrice Bergeron is typically considered a mild-mannered guy for the Boston Bruins, but he was enraged at the end of the first period Wednesday night because he felt Vancouver's Alex Burrows bit him on the finger during a post-whistle scrum.

Bergeron and Burrows got tangled up after the horn sounded to end a scoreless first period in Game 1 of the Stanley Cup Final, and the tussle ended up lasting much longer than a typical shoving match.

"Oh yeah, he did," Bergeron said when asked if Burrows bit him. "Obviously he cut me a little bit on my finger. I'm not going to be here and complain about it. I'll let the League do its job, but he sure did."

Bergeron took his glove off after the melee and skated over the officials near the penalty box to show them his finger. Both players received roughing penalties on the play, but Burrows earned an extra two minutes as well -- a double-minor.

"We were battling, we had a little exchange," Burrows said. "I'm not going to say too much about it. Obviously I got four minutes on the play."

When asked if he bit Bergeron, Burrows responded, "I don't think so. He had his finger in my mouth, but I don't think I bit him."

Bergeron said there was no history between the two players. He also said the official nearest to the situation said he didn't see the incident.

"Obviously I don't mind the rough play and those scrums at the end as long as it is just pushing and shoving and all that. But biting? I mean, c'mon," Bergeron said.

Added Boston coach Claude Julien: "I haven't seen it, to be honest with you. I haven't had time to look at that stuff right now. I'm going by what Patrice told me. Obviously there was something that happened. I guess I'll save my comments for after I see it. But if that's the case, it's a classless move … not something players should be doing at this level anyway."

FULL STORY ›EMAIL & SHARE OPTIONS ›|Comment › |Print ›

Hamhuis' night ends after big hit on Lucic

Thursday, 06.02.2011 / 12:39 AM / 2011 Stanley Cup Final - Canucks v Bruins

Dave Lozo - NHL.com Staff Writer

VANCOUVER -- Dan Hamhuis delivered the most memorable hit during Game 1 of the Stanley Cup Final on Wednesday. Unfortunately for him, it also marked the end of his night.

The Canucks' defenseman unleashed a perfect hip check on the Bruins' Milan Lucic as the hulking forward glided down the right wing past his own bench. Hamhuis sent Lucic skates over helmet, setting off a scrum that resulted in Boston's David Krejci delivering a cross check to Hamhuis that gave the Canucks a power play.

However, the 6-foot-1, 209-pound Hamhuis didn't get up from the ice after the hit. He eventually got to his skates, went to the locker room with 16 minutes left in the second period and did not return.
FULL STORY ›EMAIL & SHARE OPTIONS ›|Comment › |Print ›

Shot-chart analysis: Last shot pays off

Thursday, 06.02.2011 / 12:36 AM / 2011 Stanley Cup Final - Canucks v Bruins

Bob Condor - NHL.com Editor-in-Chief

VANCOUVER, B.C. -- The shot count was 36-33 Boston when the best scoring chance of the night clanked hard off Tim Thomas' crossbar late in the third period, a laser by Canucks defenseman Alexander Edler that didn't even count as a shot.

Of course, the best of the night, the last shot, the 70th one, scissored past Thomas, ripping through the net, through Rogers Arena, through the crowds ringing the building on the outside and, no doubt, through the closed-off streets of delirious downtown Vancouver.

Thomas stopped the first 33 shots, playing brilliantly, making all the right flops, drops and glove stops. At the other end of the rink, Roberto Luongo posted his third shutout of these playoffs, fronting his body on 36 shots in a workmanlike manner.
FULL STORY ›EMAIL & SHARE OPTIONS ›|Comment › |Print ›

Chara's night has everything but a victory

Thursday, 06.02.2011 / 12:22 AM / 2011 Stanley Cup Final - Canucks v Bruins

Corey Masisak - NHL.com Staff Writer

VANCOUVER -- This night had a little bit of everything in it for Zdeno Chara.

He was deployed in front of the net on the power play, but also spent some time on the point when the Boston Bruins had a 5-on-3 in the second period. He logged more than 28 minutes overall and more than six minutes with his team shorthanded -- both totals were tops among players on both teams.

Chara also ended up taking a faceoff, and is now 2-for-2 in the circle during the 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs. The Boston captain was also on the ice in the final minute when the Vancouver Canucks struck for the lone goal in Game 1 of the Stanley Cup Final.
FULL STORY ›EMAIL & SHARE OPTIONS ›|Comment › |Print ›

Henrik struggles, but Canucks win

Thursday, 06.02.2011 / 12:10 AM / 2011 Stanley Cup Final - Canucks v Bruins

Dave Lozo - NHL.com Staff Writer

VANCOUVER -- Henrik Sedin didn't accomplish much Wednesday night, but he got everything he wanted.

Zero goals, zero assists, zero shots, zero penalty minutes and an even-rating in 22:22. It's not exactly a game-breaking performance from the reigning Hart Trophy winner, but the Canucks' captain is now three wins away from his first Stanley Cup.

Raffi Torres broke a scoreless tie with 18.5 seconds left in the third period to give Sedin and the Canucks the only thing that mattered to them -- a 1-0 victory against the Boston Bruins in Game 1 of the Stanley Cup Final at Rogers Arena.
FULL STORY ›EMAIL & SHARE OPTIONS ›|Comment › |Print ›

NHL.com's E.J. Hradek breaks down Game 1

Wednesday, 06.01.2011 / 11:52 PM / 2011 Stanley Cup Final - Canucks v Bruins

EJ Hradek - NHL.com Analyst

After every game of the Stanley Cup Final, NHL Network analyst E.J. Hradek will break down that night's action with his instant analysis. Here is his Game 1 installment:

Let's start with the obvious: Vancouver's Roberto Luongo and Boston's Tim Thomas lived up to their Vezina Trophy-nominee status. They were both terrific.
 
I felt Thomas faced the tougher chances, starting with a quick in-close shot off the blade of Daniel Sedin just 17 seconds into the game. And, T.T. was particularly good working behind a tiring team in the third period, turning away good scoring chances from Alex Burrows, Maxim Lapierre and Jannik Hansen, before surrendering the winning goal to Raffi Torres with just 18.5 second left in regulation. There wasn't anything he could do to deny Torres.
FULL STORY ›EMAIL & SHARE OPTIONS ›|Comment › |Print ›

Key facts and figures from Game 1

Wednesday, 06.01.2011 / 11:41 PM / 2011 Stanley Cup Final - Canucks v Bruins

John Kreiser - NHL.com Columnist

There was only one goal scored in Game 1 of this year's Stanley Cup Final, but not for a lack of trying.

The Boston Bruins and Vancouver Canucks combined for 70 shots – but only the last one, by Vancouver's Raffi Torres with 18.5 seconds remaining – found the net, giving the Canucks a 1-0 victory and the lead in this best-of-7 series. Game 2 is here Saturday night.

Here are some of the other key figures from a Game 1 for the ages:
FULL STORY ›EMAIL & SHARE OPTIONS ›|Comment › |Print ›

Chara makes rare appearance in faceoff circle

Wednesday, 06.01.2011 / 9:33 PM / 2011 Stanley Cup Final - Canucks v Bruins

NHL.com

Boston captain Zdeno Chara made a rare appearance in the faceoff circle early in Game 1 of the Stanley Cup Final on Wednesday night – and beat one of the NHL's better faceoff men in Vancouver's Ryan Kesler.

With the Bruins on a four-minute power play after Daniel Sedin clipped Chara with a high stick, Chara stepped in against Kesler for an offensive-zone draw 4:31 into the game after the puck was knocked into the bench. The 6-foot-9 defenseman outmuscled Kesler to control the puck back to the left point, and the Bruins got shots on goal by David Krejci and Tomas Kaberle and a blast by Chara that went wide before Canucks goaltender Roberto Luongo froze the puck.

It was just the second faceoff of the season taken by Chara, both during the playoffs. He beat Montreal's Mike Cammalleri in Game 6 of the Bruins' opening-round series.
FULL STORY ›EMAIL & SHARE OPTIONS ›|Comment › |Print ›

2011 Stanley Cup Final: Bettman News Conference

Wednesday, 06.01.2011 / 8:02 PM / 2011 Stanley Cup Final - Canucks v Bruins

NHL.com

COMMISSIONER BETTMAN:  Welcome to Vancouver and the 2011 Stanley Cup final.  Congratulations to the Vancouver Canucks and the Boston Bruins on terrific seasons and in particular congratulations to Francesco Aquilini and Jeremy Jacobs and the managements, staffs and players on both teams after the incredible regular-season and playoffs so far.  This should be an exciting and fun Stanley Cup final.

We are concluding with this series what on every level has been a terrific season.  The level of competition, the competitive balance has been unequaled in any season, and probably in any sport.  Our fans have connected to our game in every way possible on every metric setting record numbers on every platform it's extremely gratifying.  We know the importance of how we connect with our fans.  You have the numbers.  If you need them again, our folks in PR will be happy to give them to you.

When we came back from the work stoppage, we were projecting revenues for the return-to-play season of around $2 billion.  We said if we could get to $3 billion by the last year of the basic term, which is the 2010/11 season, the growth rate would have been great.  It's too early to tell with exact precision, but if we're not exactly at $3 billion, we're certainly within chipping distance of it.
FULL STORY ›EMAIL & SHARE OPTIONS ›|Print ›

Turco Talk

Wednesday, 06.01.2011 / 5:55 PM / 2011 Stanley Cup Final - Canucks v Bruins

Marty Turco - NHL Network

Veteran NHL goalie Marty Turco is lending his expert opinion to NHL.com in the form of his own blog. Turco Talk will be updated daily with Marty's thoughts on the Stanley Cup Final between the Vancouver Canucks and Boston Bruins. Marty can also be seen daily on the NHL Network giving analysis on NHL On the Fly at the Stanley Cup Final.

For his entry on Wednesday, June 1, Marty talks about what adjustments players have to make to their preparations for a 5 p.m. start.

VANCOUVER -- Generally speaking when you think about preparing for a 5 o'clock game a lot depends on the travel schedule, the coach's decision to skate or not skate, whether it's optional or not optional, how the body is feeling. In saying that, there's nothing like playing Game 1 of the Stanley Cup Final. It's almost irrelevant what time the game is going to start. Anybody will tell you that.
FULL STORY ›EMAIL & SHARE OPTIONS ›|Comment › |Print ›
First | Prev | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | Next | Last
Quote of the Day

Not only is it a great idea, but if you don't [start using analytics] you're going to fall behind. You have to be on the cutting edge. It was [Arizona Coyotes assistant general manager] Darcy Regier who said, 'If you didn't invent it, you have to be the second- or third-best copier, because if you're fourth or fifth you've got no chance.'

— Detroit Red Wings coach Mike Babcock on his interest in advanced statistical analysis