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Round 2
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Stanley Cup Final
(Page 221 of 242)
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Five Questions: Blackhawks' Hossa much healthier

Dan Rosen - NHL.com Senior Writer

NHL.com's weekly Q&A feature called "Five Questions With ..." runs every Tuesday. We talk to key figures in the game today and ask them questions to gain insight into their lives, careers and the latest news.

The latest edition features Chicago Blackhawks right wing Marian Hossa:

WASHINGTON, D.C. -- Chicago Blackhawks right wing Marian Hossa never wanted to have back surgery this past summer, and he feels fortunate that he didn't have to. The last thing Hossa wanted to do was spend his offseason (especially one after winning the Stanley Cup) rehabbing from what could have been an invasive operation to repair nerve problems that were affecting his right leg and foot.

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Five Questions: Blackhawks' Hossa much healthier

Tuesday, 11.05.2013 / 3:00 AM / Five Questions With…

Dan Rosen - NHL.com Senior Writer

NHL.com's weekly Q&A feature called "Five Questions With ..." runs every Tuesday. We talk to key figures in the game today and ask them questions to gain insight into their lives, careers and the latest news.

The latest edition features Chicago Blackhawks right wing Marian Hossa:

WASHINGTON, D.C. -- Chicago Blackhawks right wing Marian Hossa never wanted to have back surgery this past summer, and he feels fortunate that he didn't have to. The last thing Hossa wanted to do was spend his offseason (especially one after winning the Stanley Cup) rehabbing from what could have been an invasive operation to repair nerve problems that were affecting his right leg and foot.

Hossa and the Blackhawks instead decided rest was his best option, but things looked dicey for him during training camp. Hossa didn't play in any of Chicago's six preseason games and missed most of the final week before the regular season began because of an undisclosed upper-body injury.

The injury threw off Hossa's timing and brought his health into further question.

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Daily Primer Nov. 5: Hurricanes aim to end skid

Tuesday, 11.05.2013 / 3:00 AM / NHL Insider

NHL.com

Little has gone right for the Carolina Hurricanes in recent weeks, but they're hoping a five-game homestand can reverse their fortunes.

Carolina (4-7-3), winless in five straight, returns to PNC Arena on Tuesday night to face the Philadelphia Flyers (7:30 p.m. ET, NBCSN, CSN-PH), who have had their own share of problems this season, but are coming off a 1-0 victory against the New Jersey Devils that saw them allow only 14 shots on goal.

The Hurricanes will also face the New York Islanders, Minnesota Wild, Colorado Avalanche and Anaheim Ducks on the homestand. Carolina is 1-3-3 on home ice this season.

"Home is a place where you need to execute and you need to be good," Hurricanes defenseman Jay Harrison told the team's website. "Your home record is very indicative of where you are in this League and it's something that we've consciously identified as an area that needs improvement. We want to take pride in the way we play at home."

Here's a look at the action scheduled for Tuesday:

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Heaney 'greatest defenseman' in women's history

Tuesday, 11.05.2013 / 3:00 AM / Hall of Fame

Cassie Campbell-Pascall - Special to NHL.com

Cassie Campbell-Pascall played for Canada at three Olympics and captained Canada to gold medals at the 2002 and 2006 Olympics. She is regarded as one of the finest female hockey players ever. However, she credits 2013 Hockey Hall of Fame inductee Geraldine Heaney for helping her become the player and person she became.

I never saw the 1990 IIHF World Women’s Championship live. That's where Geraldine Heaney became famous for scoring what is still considered the greatest goal in the history of women's hockey.

But I remember when I was at a tournament in Canada when I was 16 years old some members of Canada's national team came and all the young kids got a chance to meet them. That was the first time I met her. Then, of course, we played together on the national team starting in 1994. I played club hockey with her as well.

Considering all the great experiences I've had with Geraldine, there's no question in my mind that she's earned her place in the Hockey Hall of Fame.

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Heaney was a trailblazer for women's hockey

Tuesday, 11.05.2013 / 3:00 AM / Hall of Fame

Tal Pinchevsky - NHL.com Staff Writer

The list of players in the modern era compared to Bobby Orr is very short. The two most prominent names are Ray Bourque and Paul Coffey, Stanley Cup champions who were inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 2004.

The third member of that very short list, Geraldine Heaney, is about to join them in the Hall.

Whereas Bourque and Coffey became two of the most decorated players in the NHL, Heaney made her mark at a time when women's hockey players weren't supposed to skate like the boys.

"I started at a time when a lot of girls weren't playing. I was the only girl playing with my brothers. At the time, I never thought only boys played hockey. As a kid you don't care," said Heaney, who will be inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame on Nov. 11. "I would always be going to the rink and asked my dad, 'How come I can't play?' At that time the girls weren’t allowed to play with the boys. So he looked for a team for me and I had to play with girls four or five years older."

By age 13 Heaney began playing with the vaunted Toronto Aeros women's club, a team she would play with for almost two decades. As she developed her style as an offensive defenseman always looking to jump into the rush, she won Ontario provincial championships at every level. Her incredible run with the Aeros included four national championships and 15 provincial titles in 17 years. At a time when the women's game still was developing, Heaney was establishing herself as a titan. But her most iconic moment on the ice, and perhaps the most historic play in the history of women's hockey, still was around the corner.

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In the Pipeline: Sharks' Mueller evolving as a leader

Tuesday, 11.05.2013 / 3:00 AM / In the Pipeline

Derek Van Diest - NHL.com Correspondent

EDMONTON -- Mirco Mueller figured the best route to the NHL was through North America. So at 17, the native of Winterthur, Switzerland packed his bags and moved to Everett, Wash., knowing little about the region and less about the Western Hockey League.

"For me it was the best way to start the path to the NHL," Mueller said. "That's what I felt. I really just wanted to come play here. I didn't really have any idea of what team I would be playing with and I didn't know what to expect. But I knew it wasn't something that would bother me. It was something new and it's been really fun, and so far it's gone really well."

Mueller, 18, was selected by the Everett Silvertips in the first round of the 2012 Canadian Hockey League import draft. Just over a year later, he was taken at No. 18 by the San Jose Sharks in the 2013 NHL Draft.

"That was pretty special for me," Mueller said. "In Swiss hockey there was some excitement about me getting drafted. But our country is more about soccer and other European sports. Yet there were some nice comments and text messages from the people I know back home when I got drafted."

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Ducks' Palmieri enjoys memorable night back home

Tuesday, 11.05.2013 / 12:30 AM / NHL Insider

Tal Pinchevsky - NHL.com Staff Writer

NEW YORK -- Now in his fourth season with the Anaheim Ducks, forward Kyle Palmieri fulfilled his lifelong dream of being an NHL player after starring with the U.S. National Development Team Program and for one season at the University of Notre Dame. But he admitted that playing on the West Coast could be problematic when it came to fulfilling another dream: playing in front of his friends and family back East.

That problem was solved for one night. Palmieri had a magical homecoming Monday night in front of friends and family at Madison Square Garden, scoring the game-winning goal in Anaheim's 2-1 victory against the New York Rangers.

"I was looking for an opportunity to play here and close to home. It was awesome having friends and family in the stands," Palmieri said. "The only time I really get that is when they come out and visit California. It was nice."

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Draper, Clark excited to play in Alumni Showdown

Jon Lane - NHL.com Staff Writer

It was during the mid-1990s when the Detroit Red Wings transformed the Motor City into "Hockeytown."

Between 1991 and 1996, the Red Wings finished in first place in four out of five seasons, including a franchise-best 62-13-7 record in 1995-96. The only problem was the Wings were unable to hit that high note. That '95-'96 team lost in the Western Conference Final to the Colorado Avalanche, one year getting swept in four games by the New Jersey Devils in the 1995 Stanley Cup Final.

Although the Red Wings were devoid of a Stanley Cup since 1955, hockey nevertheless exploded onto the Detroit scene. The Red Wings weren't a one-year wonder that faded away, and finally hit pay dirt in 1996-97 when they plowed through the Western Conference and swept the Philadelphia Flyers to win their elusive Cup.

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Stars' Seguin trying to put Boston behind him

Monday, 11.04.2013 / 6:23 PM / NHL Insider

Matt Kalman - NHL.com Correspondent

BOSTON -- Phil Kessel once leveraged his status as a restricted free agent to get the Boston Bruins to trade him to the Toronto Maple Leafs.

While Kessel has blossomed into a superstar in a Maple Leafs sweater, the TD Garden crowd never misses an opportunity to heave scorn at him whenever Toronto is in town.

One of the draft picks the Bruins received from the Maple Leafs in the Kessel deal was used to pick Tyler Seguin at No. 2 in the 2010 NHL Draft. In three seasons with the Bruins, Seguin won the Stanley Cup as a teenager in 2011, led the team in scoring in 2011-12 and helped the club reach a second Stanley Cup Final in three seasons in June.

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Blackhawks share Cup with Walter Reed patients, staff

Monday, 11.04.2013 / 5:45 PM / News

Dan Rosen - NHL.com Senior Writer

BETHESDA, Md. -- The Chicago Blackhawks have spent the past four years developing a relationship with the USA Wounded Warriors hockey team. On Monday, they finally brought the Stanley Cup to the group of hockey players they admire so much.

The Blackhawks spent roughly 90 minutes Monday morning visiting with wounded soldiers at the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. They mingled, signed autographs and took pictures with the veterans, including a few single- and double-amputee hockey players that participate in the Wounded Warriors program.

Following the visit, the Blackhawks left Walter Reed to travel to the White House, where they were honored by President Barack Obama. They brought with them four of the wounded warriors, including double-amputees Marine Cpl. Patrick Brown and Army Capt. Mark Little.

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It's hard to walk into that locker room and look those guys in the eye when they've played -- clearly, that was our best game we've played in the series -- and I thought we deserved a better fate tonight.

— Tampa Bay Lightning coach Jon Cooper on his team's 3-2 loss to the Canadiens in Game 3 on Sunday