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Hall of Fame

Blake, Forsberg, Hasek, Modano lead 2014 Hall class

Monday, 06.23.2014 / 5:13 PM / Hall of Fame

Corey Masisak - NHL.com Staff Writer

Two of the most talented European-born players to play in the NHL highlight the Hockey Hall of Fame Class of 2014, which was announced Monday.

Goaltender Dominik Hasek of the Czech Republic and Swedish center Peter Forsberg were joined by American center Mike Modano, along with defenseman Rob Blake, coach Pat Burns and referee Bill McCreary.

"When we go through the meetings, we make it very clear that is the Hockey Hall of Fame. It is a world-renowned Hall of Fame," said Columbus Blue Jackets president John Davidson, who is chairman of the selection committee. "This tells me our game is growing worldwide and our game is being recognized all over the world for the great game that it is. When we have a class like this that is coming into the Hall, I think it says a lot about our game and how worldwide it really is."

The inductees were chosen by an 18-person committee this past weekend in Toronto. The 2014 Hockey Hall of Fame induction ceremony will take place Nov. 17.

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Hasek, Forsberg, Modano first-time Hall favorites

Friday, 06.20.2014 / 8:12 PM / Hall of Fame

NHL.com

Dominik Hasek, Peter Forsberg and Mike Modano are among the favorites to earn entry into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 2014 in their first time on the ballot.

The Hockey Hall of Fame Selection Committee will announce the Hall's 2014 inductees June 23. It will be the first selection meeting for committee chairman John Davidson, the Columbus Blue Jackets president of hockey operations, who was named to the post in April.

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Inductees relishing unforgettable weekend

Sunday, 11.10.2013 / 7:15 PM / Hall of Fame

Corey Masisak - NHL.com Staff Writer

TORONTO -- A player or coach who is successful enough to earn induction into the Hockey Hall of Fame has spent a lifetime celebrating, whether it was goals, victories, contracts or championships.

They've had fans shower them with adoration. They've accomplished things most people can only dream of.

Even for people who are heroes and role models to so many, this weekend, these days leading up to the induction ceremony, are a different kind of experience. The Hockey Hall of Fame will host the 2013 induction ceremony Monday night, and the coronation of the careers of Chris Chelios, Geraldine Heaney, Scott Niedermayer, Brendan Shanahan and Fred Shero will be complete.

"It's been like an amazing reunion with a lot of hockey fans, a lot of old high school friends and family," Shanahan said. "It's a weekend that I was probably approaching it like it was self-indulgent to ask people and come see me here. But as I said to my crew of friends last night, I'm all in now. I'm enjoying it."

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Chat with Parker sparked Chelios' career

Saturday, 11.09.2013 / 7:29 PM / Hall of Fame

Dan Rosen - NHL.com Senior Writer

TORONTO -- What if Bobby Parker wasn't at the beach that day? What if he never walked over to Chris Chelios to ask him about hockey? What if?

"He probably wouldn't have played," Parker said Saturday from the Hockey Hall of Fame, where Chelios will be enshrined Monday as a member of the Class of 2013.

It was fate, nothing more, that Parker was at the beach in San Diego that day 34 years ago. It was also fate that Parker approached Chelios and asked him what he was going to do next about hockey.

Chelios had just been cut from the upstart college team at the United States International University, the same team Parker had made. Parker wasn't sticking around, though. The rink was old and ratty. The team wasn't what he was looking for. He was heading back home to Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, but first he saw Chelios on the beach and figured he would go talk to him.

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Hall inductees relive great moments at Fan Forum

Saturday, 11.09.2013 / 6:30 PM / Hall of Fame

Dan Rosen - NHL.com Senior Writer

TORONTO -- The question came near the end of the hour-long annual Fan Forum at the Hockey Hall of Fame on Saturday. It was posed to the four living members of the Hall of Fame's Class of 2013 by a boy with a high-pitched, squeaky voice in the front row.

"How did you know when it was time to retire?"

Chris Chelios, Scott Niedermayer, Brendan Shanahan and Geraldine Heaney had to think about it. They seemed a bit surprised that such a question, one that was sure to garner an emotional response, especially on this weekend of reflection and induction for the soon-to-be enshrined legends, came from such a young person.

Chelios went first.

"Zero goals, zero assists, zero points," he said, referring to his numbers in seven games with the Atlanta Thrashers at the end of 2009-10 season, his 26th in the NHL. "Time to go."

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None played better for longer than Chelios

Saturday, 11.09.2013 / 3:00 AM / Hall of Fame

Corey Masisak - NHL.com Staff Writer

Ask enough former and current NHL players, coaches and executives about Chris Chelios and a clear pattern of responses begins to emerge.

Chelios is lauded for his toughness, his leadership, his talent, his durability and his determination. He was a hockey player's hockey player, an everyman who wouldn't be deprived of achieving his dream and a force of nature who other world-class athletes were left to marvel at.

"You know, he's just an ultimate warrior," Minnesota Wild defenseman Ryan Suter said. "I don't think you have to say anything more than that."

Added Nashville Predators general manager David Poile: "Right up there with one of the best Americans ever. Now that it's all over you think of endurance because of how long he played, how old he was when he played; you think of the word warrior."

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Leetch: Chelios was American team's leader

Saturday, 11.09.2013 / 3:00 AM / Hall of Fame

Brian Leetch - Special to NHL.com

Brian Leetch and Chris Chelios were stalwart defensemen on United States national teams, winning the gold medal at the 1996 World Cup and a silver medal at the 2002 Olympics. Leetch was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 2009.

I always tell people that Chris Chelios is America's version of Mark Messier.

They're similar in that they love the game and have a passion for it. They love to compete and winning and doing things as a group are very important to them.

They played with an edge, whether it was a stick up or a glove in the face. They would drop the gloves if they had to. You knew if you were in a competition with either of them it wasn't always going to be clean and you were going to get the worst of it because they would not back down.

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Hull: Shanahan finally where he belongs

Friday, 11.08.2013 / 3:00 AM / Hall of Fame

Brett Hull - Special to NHL.com

Brett Hull was a teammate of Brendan Shanahan's with the St. Louis Blues and Detroit Red Wings, and won a Stanley Cup together with the Red Wings in 2002. Hull was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 2009.

When Brendan Shanahan joined us with the St. Louis Blues he was 22 years and had established himself early in his career as a guy who could score about 25 or 30 goals a season. We knew there was more that he could do. He did too, but all he needed was some guidance.

He stopped, looked, listened and became a two-time 50-goal scorer. The fact that he was willing to do that, to watch and listen and learn from other great players, helped make him a Hall of Fame player.

But Brendan would not have been a Hall of Fame player without his talent. The guy could do it all.

He could fight, and you wouldn't want to drop the gloves with him, that's for sure. He could kill penalties and be your sniper on the power play. He obviously was an unbelievable goal scorer and he could make plays. Beyond that he was a natural leader -- a born leader.

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Wrist shot, grit made Shanahan an elite power forward

Friday, 11.08.2013 / 3:00 AM / Hall of Fame

Dan Rosen - NHL.com Senior Writer

John Davidson recognized Brendan Shanahan's best weapon before Shanahan even realized he had it.

It was Nov. 10, 1987. Davidson and Sam Rosen were calling the game between the New York Rangers and New Jersey Devils at Madison Square Garden. Shanahan, 18 years old at the time, had just scored his first career goal in his 15th NHL game with a quick wrist shot from the top of the right circle.

He received the puck from Claude Loiselle and saw Rangers defenseman Michel Petit closing on him. Shanahan had no choice but to snap the puck off his stick blade in one quick, short motion.

"I don't know if this is an indication of what kind of shot Shanahan has, but he took that pass and released that shot about as quick as anybody can," Davidson said seconds after the puck came off Shanahan's blade and whizzed past Rangers goalie John Vanbiesbrouck.

Up until that shot Shanahan didn't have a clue how he could score in the League. He was the No. 2 pick in the 1987 NHL Draft, and while he was known as a prolific scorer with the London Knights of the Ontario Hockey League, Shanahan never had to work on his quick release as a junior player because he always had time and space to make a move to get to the net.

But now he was in the NHL and that time and space didn't exist.

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Less tape, greater success for Shanahan

Friday, 11.08.2013 / 3:00 AM / Hall of Fame

Dan Rosen - NHL.com Senior Writer

As Brett Hull was building his Hall of Fame resume with the St. Louis Blues, his father, Bobby Hull, would spend his time hanging around the team, going into places most people wouldn't dare.

Bobby would be in the dressing room before, during and after games. He'd be in the runway leading to the dressing room as the final buzzer sounded. And, as fate would have it for Brendan Shanahan, Bobby would hang around by the players' sticks, admiring them and, in Shanahan's case, altering them.

"Brendan's goal scoring, you have to give all the credit to my dad," Brett Hull told NHL.com.

Shortly before Christmas in 1991, Shanahan, who had been with the Blues for less than two months at that point, arrived for practice with only a few minutes to spare. He hurriedly strapped on his equipment and grabbed his sticks. He didn't have time to examine them before darting out onto the ice to avoid being late.

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Quote of the Day

I came into a team that had 65 points, that was at the bottom of the basement, a team that everybody wrote off as never going to be good. My goal is to go from the very bottom to the very top.

— Forward Brandon Dubinsky on signing a six-year contract extension with the Columbus Blue Jackets