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(Page 257 of 259)
NHL Insider

Not every award winner is named Gretzky

Wednesday, 08.25.2010 / 10:47 AM / NHL Insider

John Kreiser - NHL.com Columnist

NHL postseason awards are something to cherish -- a sign that no matter what else a player may have done during his career, there was a season in which his performance was good enough to be recognized.

But not every NHL award-winner is a hockey immortal. For every Bobby Orr or Wayne Gretzky, who have enough hardware on their mantelpiece to stock a trophy shop, there are players who were in the right place at the right time to get their names on some of hockey's most famous hardware.

Here's a look at some of the one-time winners of the NHL's major trophies.
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A look at the first five years of the shootout

Friday, 08.20.2010 / 12:10 PM / NHL Insider

John Kreiser - NHL.com Columnist

We've now had five seasons in which games that remain tied after overtime have been decided by a shootout -- a breakaway competition of three (or more, as needed) rounds in which shooters go 1-on-1 with goaltenders.

The stakes can be high: Philadelphia's run to the Stanley Cup Final never would have happened if the Flyers hadn't beaten the New York Rangers in a shootout on the final day of the season. Three years ago, the New York Islanders made the postseason with a shootout win in their season finale.

The shootout's five seasons have shown that some players and some teams are better at it than others. Most interesting is the fact that some of hockey's biggest names have struggled in the shootout, while a number of lesser lights have shone brightly.
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East: Which playoff misses could turn into hits?

Tuesday, 08.17.2010 / 5:01 PM / NHL Insider

Adam Kimelman - NHL.com Deputy Managing Editor

Summer may be the most enjoyable time of the season for many people, but when it comes to NHL teams, they want to put off the start to the fun times as long as possible.

For the seven Eastern Conference teams that missed out on the 2010 Stanley Cup Playoff party, their goal since the second week of April has been figuring out how to extend their seasons into May -- or even June, like the conference champion Philadelphia Flyers.

So how can the teams that missed the fun turn into postseason hits? With about a month until training camp opens, NHL.com today examines why fans of the unlucky seven can hold onto their playoff hopes.
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West: Which playoff misses could turn into hits?

Tuesday, 08.17.2010 / 2:44 PM / NHL Insider

Adam Kimelman - NHL.com Deputy Managing Editor

Summer may be the most enjoyable time of the season for many, but when it comes to NHL teams, they want to put off the start to the fun times as long as possible.

But for the seven Western Conference teams that missed the 2010 Stanley Cup Playoff party, their goal since the second week of April has been figuring out how to extend their seasons into May -- or even June, like the Stanley Cup champion Chicago Blackhawks.

So how can the teams that missed the fun turn into postseason hits? With about a month until training camp opens, NHL.com today examines why fans of the unlucky seven can hold onto their playoff hopes.
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You're never too old for a big season

Friday, 08.13.2010 / 11:09 AM / NHL Insider

John Kreiser - NHL.com Columnist

Though hockey is increasingly a young man's game, there always has been a place for the older player who can contribute.

Landmark achievements like seasons with 50 goals and 100 points, or winning the Norris or Vezina Trophy, usually belong to younger players. But players who have reached their 35th birthday have made some history of their own.

Here's a look at some of the best seasons by the NHL's 35-and-over crowd:

FORWARDS

100 POINTS

Gordie Howe, 1968-69 (age 41)
Johnny Bucyk, 1970-71 (age 35)
Wayne Gretzky, 1995-96 (age 35)
Joe Sakic, 2006-07 (age 37)


No athlete in the history of North American professional sports is comparable to Gordie Howe. "Mr. Hockey" was a great player when he was young and when he was old enough (almost) to be the father of some of his teammates. But his best NHL season, in terms of points, was in 1968-69. One day before his 41st birthday, Howe scored a goal in Detroit's 9-5 loss to Chicago (the Red Wings' 76th of 78 games) to reach the 100-point mark for the first (and only) time in his NHL career.

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Goalies still individuals in a team sport

Wednesday, 08.11.2010 / 3:44 PM / NHL Insider

Michael Stainkamp - NHL.com Staff Writer

Hockey may be the ultimate team sport. Yet in no sport does one individual play as crucial a role in his team's success as an NHL goaltender.

Goaltenders have their own coaches and their own rituals. Some are placid, some talkative; others are feisty or combative -- sometimes even with their own teammates. A goaltender can steal a game for an outmanned team. But when a goaltender fails, everyone in the building knows it.

"The goalie is an individual position in a team sport," New York Islanders goaltender coach Mike Dunham told NHL.com. "They're out there to stop the puck and that's it, so they're off on their own island."
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A look at some of the NHL's best teenage debuts

Wednesday, 08.11.2010 / 12:34 PM / NHL Insider

John Kreiser - NHL.com Columnist

The Edmonton Oilers are hoping that Taylor Hall's success in junior hockey carries over as he prepares for his NHL career.

The Oilers took Hall with the No. 1 pick in the Entry Draft, and he's expected to step right into a regular role at age 18. Edmonton opted to select Hall even though center Tyler Seguin was rated slightly higher by NHL Central Scouting; the Boston Bruins, picking second, were more than happy to scoop him up.

Last year's No. 1 pick, John Tavares, had an up-and-down season, but finished with 24 goals and a team-leading 54 points for a team that struggled offensively. The Oilers and Bruins both would likely be happy to see those kinds of numbers from their prized rookies.
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Seguin focuses on first Bruins camp

Monday, 08.09.2010 / 1:00 AM / NHL Insider

Mike G. Morreale - NHL.com Staff Writer

Less than a month after turning more than a few heads at the Boston Bruins Development Camp in Wilmington, Mass., Tyler Seguin was doing the same last week at Team Canada's junior development camp in Newfoundland.

Sure, he has impressed his teammates and coaches, but what else would you expect from the No. 2 pick in the NHL Entry Draft? Three days after inking a three-year, entry-level contract with the Bruins on his kitchen table in Brampton, Ont., Seguin discussed his future with NHL.com during a break in the action at junior camp.

"It's nice knowing you don't have to worry about signing an NHL contract anymore and now it's just about focusing on and earning that spot and playing to make the (Bruins) roster," Seguin said.
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What's in a name when it comes to NHL success?

Friday, 08.06.2010 / 12:45 PM / NHL Insider

John Kreiser - NHL.com Columnist

The thousands of players who've suited up for NHL games include the gamut of first names -- everything from Aaron (Broten, among others) to Zybnek (Michalek, now of the Penguins). But if you want your son to have a career in the NHL, it might be best to name him Mike or Bob.

Michael and Robert (and their various derivatives) are by far the most plentiful on the NHL's all-time player list. There have been more than 200 players named Mike/Michael/Michel (Puck Prospectus put the number at 206) in the NHL, the most of any first name. Robert/Bob/Bobby is next at 194, with Dave/David/Davey a distant third at 134.
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Flyers' Laperriere ready for new season

Thursday, 08.05.2010 / 11:48 AM / NHL Insider

NHL.com

A trip to the Stanley Cup Final has left Ian Laperriere hungrier than ever to win a title. Taking a puck to the face during last spring's playoffs has left him vowing to wear a half-shield for the rest of his NHL career -- but not to quit the fighting aspect of his game.

"I will always play with a half-shield now," Laperriere told the Philadelphia Flyers' website this week. "The difference is when I fight now I will take off my helmet. I am going to have to fight. The shield won't make a difference. I will have to take off my helmet and square-off instead of just grabbing the guy and fighting in the moment."

Laperriere started wearing a shield after he blocked a point shot from the point by New Jersey Devils' defenseman Paul Martin during Game 5 in the first round. Taking a shot in the face left him with 70 stitches over his right eye and what was eventually to found out to be a brain bruise that caused him to miss the next 10 playoff games. He returned for Game 4 of the Eastern Conference Finals against Montreal and played all six games of the Final against Chicago.

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Quote of the Day

The groove of being behind a bench is going to be interesting at first, but thank God we have a few exhibition games to get rid of those cobwebs. Overall the excitement of it all and the freshness and coming back refreshed, all those things are going to be assets. If [the players] come ready to give their best effort in practice and games, good things are going to happen. I'm always looking for results. It's not always on the scoreboard. It's winning and building something.

— Bryan Trottier on making his return to coaching as an assistant with the Sabres