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92/93: Greatest Season?

May, Jeanneret forever linked by “May Day” goal

Wednesday, 07.31.2013 / 9:00 AM / 92/93: Greatest Season?

John Ciolfi - NHL.com Staff Writer

Many believe the 1992-93 NHL season was among the finest staged in the League's history. From the addition of two teams through expansion, to the sudden prominence of European players, to the heroics of Pittsburgh's Mario Lemieux, to the crowning of Montreal as Stanley Cup champions, the season was full of memorable moments. On its 20th anniversary, NHL.com will spend the year looking back at the key moments of that '92-93 season to see if it may indeed be the NHL's Greatest Season.

Playoffs. Overtime.

Just seeing those two words next two each other will cause the hearts of most hockey fans to start racing -- for good reason.

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Sting of North Stars departure remains 20 years later

Saturday, 04.13.2013 / 2:09 PM / 92/93: Greatest Season?

Dan Rosen - NHL.com Senior Writer

Many believe the 1992-93 NHL season was among the finest staged in the League's history. From the addition of two teams through expansion, to the sudden prominence of European players, to the heroics of Pittsburgh's Mario Lemieux, to the crowning of Montreal as Stanley Cup champions, the season was full of memorable moments. On its 20th anniversary, NHL.com will spend the year looking back at the key moments of that '92-93 season to see if it may indeed be the NHL's Greatest Season.

An eight-year old boy named Zach Parise sat in the stands at Met Center 20 years ago watching in amazement as adults around him started tearing apart the seats following another loss, the 969th in the history of their favorite team.

"They were either keeping them or throwing them onto the ice," Parise, now a 28-year-old superstar in Minnesota, told NHL.com.

That was April 13, 1993, the final home game and second-to-last game in the history of the Minnesota North Stars.

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EA's NHL '94 remains landmark game after 20 years

Monday, 03.18.2013 / 9:00 AM / 92/93: Greatest Season?

Tal Pinchevsky - NHL.com Staff Writer

Many believe the 1992-93 NHL season was among the finest staged in the League's history. From the addition of two teams through expansion, to the sudden prominence of European players, to the heroics of Pittsburgh's Mario Lemieux, to the crowning of Montreal as Stanley Cup champions, the season was full of memorable moments. On its 20th anniversary, NHL.com will spend the year looking back at the key moments of that '92-93 season to see if it may indeed be the NHL's Greatest Season.

In an NHL career that spanned 20 years, Jeremy Roenick played in nine All-Star Games, scored more than 500 goals, registered more than 1,200 points, won an Olympic silver medal and established himself as one of the most colorful characters in hockey history.

But for many of his biggest fans, JR's greatest achievements did not take place on an actual sheet of ice.

That's because the 2010 inductee into the United States Hockey Hall of Fame is also one of the most dominating video-game characters of all time, thanks mostly to the skills demonstrated by his avatar in EA Sports' NHL '94.

The classic game was released 20 years ago this month and introduced countless people to hockey through their Nintendo and Sega consoles.

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Stanley Cup came full circle during centennial season

Monday, 03.18.2013 / 3:00 AM / 92/93: Greatest Season?

John Kreiser - NHL.com Columnist

The most famous trophy in sports spent much of its 100th anniversary season on the road. In the end, though, the Stanley Cup ended its centennial season right back where it started a century earlier.

In 1992-93, the NHL celebrated the 100th anniversary of the Stanley Cup by putting the trophy on tour. The Cup was made available for visits to all 24 teams, as well as numerous non-NHL markets -- befitting a "people trophy."

John Kerr, the executive director of NHL Anniversaries, said, "We want people across North America to continue to have the opportunity during the centennial year."

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Stanley Cup errors through the years

Monday, 03.18.2013 / 3:00 AM / 92/93: Greatest Season?

NHL.com

Engraving the names of the Stanley Cup champions was first done by the Montreal Wanderers in 1906-07, and it became an annual tradition in 1924. There are more than 2,200 names engraved on the Cup; Henri Richard leads all players with 11, Scotty Bowman is tops among coaches with nine, and Jean Beliveau leads everyone with 17 -- 10 as a player and seven as an executive, all with Montreal.

With all those names, there are bound to be a few errors and corrections. Here are some of them:

1937-38: Chicago Blackhawks -- Pete Palangio's name appears twice; it's spelled correctly once and incorrectly as PALAGIO.

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Stanley Cup timeline, from 1892 to today

Monday, 03.18.2013 / 3:00 AM / 92/93: Greatest Season?

John Kreiser - NHL.com Columnist

Key dates in the history of the Stanley Cup:

1892: The Lord Stanley of Preston proposes the creation of a trophy to be awarded to the champion hockey team in Canada.

1893: The Stanley Cup, a silver bowl that cost less than $50 at the time, is awarded to the Montreal A.A.A., whose affiliate, the Montreal Hockey Club, finished first in the Amateur Hockey Association of Canada, a five-team league. The Montreal team won seven of its eight games. No playoffs were held.

1894: The Cup changed to a challenge format, with the trustees deciding which challenges were valid. In the first Stanley Cup Playoff game, the Montreal A.A.A. defeated the Montreal Victorias 3-2 on March 17, then defeated the Ottawa Capitals 3-1 five days later to retain the Cup. Until 1912, challenges could take place at any time, and teams could defend the Cup numerous times in the same year.

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Selanne arrived with flashy 76-goal rookie season

Saturday, 03.02.2013 / 3:04 AM / 92/93: Greatest Season?

Tal Pinchevsky - NHL.com Staff Writer

Many believe the 1992-93 NHL season was among the finest staged in the League's history. From the addition of two teams through expansion, to the sudden prominence of European players, to the heroics of Pittsburgh's Mario Lemieux, to the crowning of Montreal as Stanley Cup champions, the season was full of memorable moments. On its 20th anniversary, NHL.com will spend the year looking back at the key moments of that '92-93 season to see if it may indeed be the NHL's Greatest Season.

Entering a home matchup against the Minnesota North Stars on Feb. 28, 1993, Winnipeg Jets rookie Teemu Selanne had 47 goals and was inching toward the NHL's 15-year-old rookie record of 53, held by Mike Bossy of the New York Islanders.

But Selanne had gone three straight games without a goal the previous week, his longest "drought" since the season's opening month.

Any chatter surrounding Selanne's slowed scoring pace was silenced when he scored four goals.

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Part 1: Lemieux's cancer comeback great sports story

Saturday, 03.02.2013 / 3:02 AM / 92/93: Greatest Season?

Corey Masisak - NHL.com Staff Writer

Many believe the 1992-93 NHL season was among the finest staged in the League's history. From the addition of two teams through expansion, to the sudden prominence of European players, to the heroics of Pittsburgh's Mario Lemieux, to the crowning of Montreal as Stanley Cup champions, the season was full of memorable moments. On its 20th anniversary, NHL.com will spend the year looking back at the key moments of that '92-93 season to see if it may indeed be the NHL's Greatest Season.

Mario Lemieux's arrival in Pittsburgh in 1984 changed the city and the course of hockey history.

Lemieux became one of the League's all-time greatest players and helped establish Pittsburgh as one of the best hockey cities in the United States. His skill and size was unprecedented, and eventually Le Magnifique led the Penguins to back-to-back Stanley Cup championships in 1991 and 1992.

His 1992-93 season became one of the most remarkable for a professional athlete in the history of organized sport, not just the one played on ice with a puck and some sticks. Lemieux had missed more than 100 games with back problems in his career, but on Jan. 12, 1993, the Penguins announced their 27-year-old superstar center had cancer.

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Part 2: Lemieux gets ovation from Philly fans in return

Saturday, 03.02.2013 / 3:01 AM / 92/93: Greatest Season?

Corey Masisak - NHL.com Staff Writer

Mario Lemieux's 1992-93 season became one of the most remarkable for a professional athlete in the history of organized sport. Lemieux had missed more than 100 games with back problems in his career, but on Jan. 12, 1993, the Pittsburgh Penguins announced their 27-year-old superstar center had cancer.

On March 2, Mario Lemieux finished his first game back after radiation treatments with a goal and an assist, though the Penguins lost to the Flyers, 5-4. The goal came 1:54 into the second period against goaltender Dominic Rousell, and Lemieux added an assist on a Kevin Stevens goal 95 seconds later.

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Part 3: Amazing pace gives Lemieux scoring title

Saturday, 03.02.2013 / 3:00 AM / 92/93: Greatest Season?

Corey Masisak - NHL.com Staff Writer

Mario Lemieux's 1992-93 season became one of the most remarkable for a professional athlete in the history of organized sport. Lemieux had missed more than 100 games with back problems in his career, but on Jan. 12, 1993, the Pittsburgh Penguins announced their 27-year-old superstar center had cancer.

When Mario Lemieux returned in March, he trailed Buffalo Sabres forward Pat LaFontaine by 12 points for the NHL scoring lead. Lemieux finished the season with 30 goals and 26 assists in 20 games -- a 229-point projection over the course of a full season -- to pass LaFontaine and capture the Art Ross Trophy by 12 points.
Lemieux finished with 69 goals and 160 points in 60 games.

The Penguins were a League-best 29-11-2 before Lemieux's absence, and he was on pace to challenge Wayne Gretzky's NHL record of 216 points. They went 11-10-2 without Lemieux, but his return sparked an NHL-record 17-game winning streak before a tie against the New Jersey Devils in the final contest of the regular season.

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My job was to get that puck and put it on net, and his job was not letting me do it. I got the best of that, but that game's over and to be honest I already forgot about it.

— Canadiens forward Alex Galchenyuk on his late game-tying goal in Montreal's 2-1 OT win
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