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Jimmy Waite named Blackhawks goaltending coach

Monday, 07.07.2014 / 4:56 PM / News

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Jimmy Waite named Blackhawks goaltending coach
The Chicago Blackhawks hired Jimmy Waite as goaltending coach, the team announced Monday.

The Chicago Blackhawks hired Jimmy Waite as goaltending coach, the team announced Monday.

Waite played 58 games with the Blackhawks over parts of eight seasons from 1988-1997. The Sherbrooke, Quebec, native was selected by the Blackhawks in the first round (No. 8) of the 1987 NHL, Draft and played 106 games with the Blackhawks, San Jose Sharks and Phoenix Coyotes from 1988-1999.

"We are pleased to welcome Jimmy back to our organization in his new role," Blackhawks general manager Stan Bowman said. "He has over two decades of professional hockey experience and will be a great addition to our coaching staff."

Waite, 45, spent the past three seasons as the goaltending coach for the Chicoutimi Sagueneens of the Quebec Major Junior Hockey League. Prior to his coaching career, Waite had a 22-year professional playing career from 1988-2010.

"I'm very excited to come back to the Chicago Blackhawks, the team that drafted me in 1987," Waite said. "I look forward to working with Corey [Crawford] and Antti [Raanta], and to help contribute to the success of this organization."

Jimmy Waite is the younger brother of former Blackhawks goaltending coach Stephane Waite.

Quote of the Day

It's pretty crazy, but believe me when I say we didn't draft these players with the mindset we had to because they had good hockey-playing dads. It just turned out that way. But we're certainly glad they're a part of our organization.

— Arizona Coyotes director of amateur scouting Tim Bernhardt regarding the coincidence that six of the organization's top prospects are sons of former NHL players