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Big Apple, big prices for Stanley Cup seats with New York market the most costly

Tuesday, 06.03.2014 / 2:55 PM / News

The Canadian Press

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Big Apple, big prices for Stanley Cup seats with New York market the most costly

LOS ANGELES, Calif. - Big Apple equals big prices when it comes to buying a Stanley Cup ticket on the secondary market.

SeatGeek, an aggregator for the secondary ticket market, reports a "very high" demand for tickets in both Los Angeles and New York.

"But there's a huge difference between the two cities," said SeatGeek spokesman Connor Gregoire. "It's much more a seller's market in New York."

The average ticket price for Games 1 and 2 in Los Angeles is about US$800, with the cheapest going for $400, according to Gregoire. In New York, the average price for Games 3 and 4 is $1,800, with the cheapest at $1,000.

"It's actually cheaper, say you're a Rangers fan in New York, for you to book a last-minute round-trip flight to L.A., stay in a hotel, buy two tickets to Game 1 or 2," said Gregoire. "You'd actually save money doing that versus buying two tickets in New York."

Seeing the Rangers is a tough ticket during the regular season. Add pent-up demand due to a 20-year absence from the Cup final and New Yorkers' desire to see a winner and you have a recipe for a sticker shock.

Plus there are sports fans with some deep pockets there.

They need them. Face value for most Rangers Cup final tickets start at $450 with an average of $750, according to Gregoire. Ice-level seats can exceed $1,000.

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