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Seidenberg could have played if Bruins advanced

Friday, 05.16.2014 / 3:42 PM / News

By Matt Kalman - NHL.com Correspondent

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Seidenberg could have played if Bruins advanced
Had the Bruins advanced beyond their second-round series against the Canadiens, defenseman Dennis Seidenberg probably would've returned.

BOSTON -- Had the Boston Bruins advanced beyond their Eastern Conference Second Round series against the Montreal Canadiens, defenseman Dennis Seidenberg probably would've returned to the Bruins' lineup.

The Bruins lost Game 7 to the Canadiens 3-1 on Wednesday.

Seidenberg had surgery to repair an ACL/MCL injury in early January. The prognosis was a return in 6-8 months, but he'd been skating for more than a month and took some light contact by the time the series ended.

Had the Bruins advanced beyond their second-round series against the Canadiens, defenseman Dennis Seidenberg probably would've returned. (Photo: Getty Images)

"There would have been a good chance for me to play next round," Seidenberg said at TD Garden on Friday. "Too bad it didn't happen, but I think we did everything in our power in trying to get back."

Seidenberg had one goal and nine assists in 34 regular-season games.

The 32-year-old said he talked to other people who had his type of injury and was inspired to attempt to make an comeback earlier than the doctors had planned.

"It was definitely strong enough. I mean if something would have happened, it would have been another freak thing," he said. "You never think about it when you play. Once you start playing you focus on a game and just try not to think about it, which is a tough thing. In a situation like that I think it's very doable and you just play."

Seidenberg is signed for four seasons beyond this year at an annual NHL salary-cap charge of $4 million.

Neither general manager Peter Chiarelli nor coach Claude Julien was willing to divulge what injuries other Bruins were dealing with during the series, but several players spoke with varying levels of transparency on breakup day.

Most importantly, defenseman Zdeno Chara was dealing with an injury to his left hand. Reports in recent days said it was either a hand or finger fracture. Chara would not get into specifics but he said he's not planning on surgery.

"Again, I don't like to talk about injuries. It's something that doesn't need to be surgically [fixed] so far and hopefully it stays that way," said Chara, who had no goals and two assists against Montreal. "It's not something I'm going to blame or making excuses. That's the way it is. We all play with different injuries, or banged up and that's part of hockey in the playoffs. For sure, that's not why we lost."

Forward Milan Lucic, who had one empty-net goal and two assists against the Canadiens, met the media wearing a brace on his left wrist. He said he jammed it in the first period of Game 7. He's scheduled for an MRI but he's hopeful it's just a sprain.

Forward Matt Fraser, who joined the Bruins for Game 4 against Montreal and scored the overtime game-winner, was playing with a broken foot. Fraser was injured in Game 1 of the American Hockey League playoffs with the Providence Bruins against the Springfield Falcons on a blocked shot a week before he joined Boston. He might need surgery.

Forward Chris Kelly did not play in the playoffs because of a herniated disk in his back. He will have surgery soon and the recovery time is expected to be 4-6 weeks, he said, so he should be ready for training camp.

Defenseman Adam McQuaid, who didn't play in the playoffs because of ankle surgery, said he had been playing with the injury for some time. The quadriceps injury that initially caused him to leave the lineup requires more rest.

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