We have updated our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. By continuing to use the NHL’s online services, you agree to these updated documents and to the arbitration of disputes.
Welcome |Account|Sign Out 
NEW! SIGN IN WITH YOUR SOCIAL PROFILE
OR
Username or EmailPassword

Canucks announce Quinn will go in Ring of Honour

By Kevin Woodley - NHL.com Correspondent

Share with your Friends


Canucks announce Quinn will go in Ring of Honour
Pat Quinn, who coached the Vancouver Canucks to the 1994 Stanley Cup Final, will be inducted into the team's Ring of Honour next month.

VANCOUVER -- For Pat Quinn, the announcement that he'll be inducted into the Vancouver Canucks' Ring of Honour coming the same day the team he coached to the 1994 Stanley Cup Final was celebrated at the 2014 Tim Hortons NHL Heritage Classic was a perfect combination.

Quinn, who was hired as coach, president and general manager of the Canucks in 1987, was part of pregame ceremonies at BC Place to honor the 1993-1994 Vancouver team's run to Game 7 of the Cup Final against the New York Rangers. His Ring of Honour induction, which will take place next month at Rogers Arena, was announced in the second period and drew a standing ovation from 54,194 fans.

"These guys are the epitome of the best team I had," said Quinn, who played nine NHL seasons before starting his coaching career as an assistant with the Philadelphia Flyers in 1977.

Quinn, now 71, gave up his coaching duties with the Canucks after the 1994 Cup run, but stayed as president and general manager until November 1997.

Quinn went on to coach the Toronto Maple Leafs for seven seasons and worked with the Edmonton Oilers for two, but he never really left Vancouver. In April, he will become the first non-player in the Canucks' Ring of Honour, joining Orland Kurtenbach, Thomas Gradin, Harold Snepts and Kirk McLean, whom Quinn traded for in 1987.

"I worked for some good organizations, but none had the influence on me and the emotional attachment the Canucks did," Quinn said.

The feeling appeared to be mutual at BC Place on Sunday.

Former captain Trevor Linden, who was the first player drafted by Quinn, said the affection is based on the legacy Quinn left.

"He made hockey relevant again in Vancouver, but not only that, it's the pieces he left," Linden said, listing Calgary Flames president Brian Burke and Maple Leafs general manager Dave Nonis among those who got their first NHL jobs from Quinn. "He's left his mark long after he left the organization; people still recognize his impact."

The Ottawa Senators beat the Canucks 4-2 on Sunday.

Quote of the Day

It's pretty crazy, but believe me when I say we didn't draft these players with the mindset we had to because they had good hockey-playing dads. It just turned out that way. But we're certainly glad they're a part of our organization.

— Arizona Coyotes director of amateur scouting Tim Bernhardt regarding the coincidence that six of the organization's top prospects are sons of former NHL players