We have updated our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. By continuing to use the NHL’s online services, you agree to these updated documents and to the arbitration of disputes.
Welcome |Account|Sign Out 
NEW! SIGN IN WITH YOUR SOCIAL PROFILE
OR
Username or EmailPassword
 
SHARE

Coyotes captain Doan 'better' after offseason surgery

Thursday, 09.05.2013 / 6:00 PM / News

NHL.com

Share with your Friends


Coyotes captain Doan 'better' after offseason surgery
Phoenix Coyotes captain Shane Doan said this week he is healthy and ready to go following offseason sports hernia surgery in Philadelphia.

Phoenix Coyotes captain Shane Doan said this week he is healthy and ready to go following offseason sports hernia surgery in Philadelphia.

Doan suffered a sports hernia on his left side last season after tearing the right side the year before. He had a procedure in mid-May to remove a mesh used to repair each side in 2000 and 2001, respectively.

Despite the pain, the right wing led the Coyotes with 13 goals and was third in points with 27, playing all 48 games. The highlight of his season came March 19 against the Los Angeles Kings when he scored twice on 11 shots on goal, with 13 hits.

"You can’t be as physical (with the injury)," Doan told The Arizona Republic. "You have no jump, and it hurts to get up. It hurts to move. Last season was a tough one where you felt like you were chasing it the whole year."

Doan, who turns 37 Oct. 10, a week after the Coyotes open the regular season against the New York Rangers, enters 2013-14 with a body he said feels younger.

"The things that were going on make you feel older, like everything was a little more work, and now you feel a little better," Doan said.

Quote of the Day

It's pretty crazy, but believe me when I say we didn't draft these players with the mindset we had to because they had good hockey-playing dads. It just turned out that way. But we're certainly glad they're a part of our organization.

— Arizona Coyotes director of amateur scouting Tim Bernhardt regarding the coincidence that six of the organization's top prospects are sons of former NHL players