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Key facts and figures from Game 5

Saturday, 06.22.2013 / 11:09 PM / Blackhawks vs Bruins - 2013 Stanley Cup Final

By John Kreiser - NHL.com Columnist

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Key facts and figures from Game 5
A look at some of the key facts and figures from Game 5

The Chicago Blackhawks had to hang on in the third period, but they're just one victory away from their second Stanley Cup in 36 months. The Blackhawks got two goals by Patrick Kane and 24 saves by Corey Crawford as they held off the Boston Bruins 3-1 Saturday in Game 5 to take a 3-2 lead in the best-of-7 series.

A victory by the Blackhawks in Game 6 on Monday (8 p.m. ET; NBC, CBC, RDS) will return the Cup to Chicago, which ended a 49-year drought by winning it all in 2010.

Here are some of the key facts and figures from Game 5:

0 -- Minutes in this series in which either team has led by three or more goals. Both teams have had two-goal leads in two of the games (Boston in Games 1 and 3, Chicago in Games 4 and 5), but neither has been able to push the margin to three goals.

1 -- Losses by Boston goaltender Tuukka Rask this spring in a game after allowing four or more goals. Rask had allowed four or more goals four times this spring before surrendering six in Game 4; he had won the following game all four times before Saturday.

2 -- Assists by Chicago captain Jonathan Toews, who helped set up both goals by linemate Patrick Kane. But Toews took a couple of big hits late in the second period and didn't play at all in the third period.

3 -- Empty-net goals scored by the Blackhawks this spring. Dave Bolland scored in the final seconds on Saturday night after the Bruins had pulled Rask. It was the first empty-netter allowed by Boston this spring.

4 -- Times in the past five years in which the teams entered Game 5 of the Final after splitting the first four games. The home team has won all four -- but on two of the three previous occasions, the losing team won Games 6 and 7.

6 -- Consecutive years in which the Stanley Cup Final has gone at least six games. It's the longest such streak since the NHL adopted the best-of-7 format in 1939. The longest previous streak was five years, from 1971-75.

8 -- Hits by Boston forward Milan Lucic, the most of any player on either team. In all, the Bruins outhit Chicago 53-22. Boston has outhit Chicago in each of the past four games.

10 -- Wins by the Blackhawks, without a loss, when leading after two periods in this year's playoffs. The Bruins fell to 2-4 when trailing after 40 minutes. ­

11 -- Victories for Chicago in the 14 games this spring in which it has scored first. That includes a 2-1 record in the Final. Boston fell to 5-4 when allowing the first goal, though the Bruins are the only team with a winning record when the opposition gets the first goal.

24 -- Finals, including this year, in which the teams have split the first two games. Fifteen of the first 23 to be tied 2-2 were won by the team that took Game 5 -- but since 2001, the team that lost Game 5 has won the Cup four times in six tries.

25 -- Points during this year's Stanley Cup Playoffs by Boston center David Krejci, who leads all scorers. Krejci assisted on a third-period goal by Zdeno Chara to extend his lead in the points race -- he has already scored more than any player in last year's playoffs.

33 -- Faceoffs won by the Blackhawks, against 24 losses. It was the first time in five games that the Blackhawks won more draws than they lost against the best faceoff team in the League.

42 -- Years since the Blackhawks have had a shutout in the Stanley Cup Final. The last one was May 13, 1971, when they beat the Montreal Canadiens 2-0 at Chicago Stadium in Game 5. Montreal won Games 6 and 7. It's the third shutout in the Final in Blackhawks' history -- they had one each in 1934 and 1962.

49 -- Seconds played by Boston center Patrice Bergeron in the second period. Bergeron appeared to be injured during his first shift of the period, played 16 seconds on a later shift and did not appear again. He was taken via ambulance to a local hospital during the third period after seeing a total of 6:06 of ice time.

Quote of the Day

The groove of being behind a bench is going to be interesting at first, but thank God we have a few exhibition games to get rid of those cobwebs. Overall the excitement of it all and the freshness and coming back refreshed, all those things are going to be assets. If [the players] come ready to give their best effort in practice and games, good things are going to happen. I'm always looking for results. It's not always on the scoreboard. It's winning and building something.

— Bryan Trottier on making his return to coaching as an assistant with the Sabres