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Calgary captain Jarome Iginla takes blame for Flames' lack of goal-scoring

Tuesday, 04.06.2010 / 7:38 PM / News

The Canadian Press

CALGARY - Calgary Flames captain Jarome Iginla points the finger at himself for his team's lack of goals this season.

With the Flames among the bottom three teams in the NHL in production, the player who has twice led the league in goal-scoring admits he's struggled.

"I'm going to be around 70 points. It's not enough," Iginla said Tuesday prior to a game against San Jose. "We've had a lot of trouble scoring goals. That's been my job and my role."

After assisting on the Sidney Crosby's goal to win Olympic gold on Feb. 28, the 32-year-old right-winger has scored five goals in 17 games for the Flames.

"I haven't been very good," Iginla said. "It's not been for lack of want or lack or trying. Unfortunately I've been in a rut and I'm going to work to get out of it.

"Do I think my best times are behind me? No I don't. I've been in a lot of tough stretches before and droughts."

Just two seasons removed from a 50-goal campaign in 2007-08, Iginla led the Flames with 32 goals and 37 assists heading into the game against San Jose, which put him on pace for his lowest total in five seasons. He hasn't scored less than 90 points since the 2005-06 season.

"I haven't produced as much as I would like," he said. "This year, it's been tough. We haven't been a very high-scoring team."

Quote of the Day

It's pretty crazy, but believe me when I say we didn't draft these players with the mindset we had to because they had good hockey-playing dads. It just turned out that way. But we're certainly glad they're a part of our organization.

— Arizona Coyotes director of amateur scouting Tim Bernhardt regarding the coincidence that six of the organization's top prospects are sons of former NHL players