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Entry Draft by the Numbers

Saturday, 06.27.2009 / 5:27 PM / 2009 NHL Entry Draft

By John Kreiser - NHL.com Columnist

7 -- Swedish players taken in the first round, the most ever in the Entry Draft. Defenseman Victor Hedman, taken No. 2 overall, heads the list. In all, 24 Swedes were taken -- the most of any country outside North America and a jump from the 17 taken last year.

The 2009 NHL Entry Draft is history -- and teams will now begin working to help turn the talented youngsters they've selected into actual NHL players.

Here are some of the key numbers from this year's draft:

0 -- Goaltenders taken in the first round of the draft. It's the second time that's happened in three years -- but before 2007, there hadn't been a goalie-free first round since 1992. The goalie drought ended with the first pick on Saturday when the New York Islanders took Mikko Koskinen, a Finnish netminder, with the 31st pick -- the first of 21 goaltenders selected in the draft.

1
-- Russian-born players taken in the first round. Defenseman Dmitry Kulikov, who was born in Russia but played with Drummondville of the QMJHL this season, was taken No. 14 by the Florida Panthers -- who will lose their best defenseman, free agent Jay Bouwmeester. Kulikov was one of only seven Russians taken in the draft, down from nine last year.

3 -- Teams that had multiple choices in the first round, up from one at the start of the round. The New York Islanders started with two picks in the first round; the Anaheim Ducks picked up an extra one from Philadelphia in the Chris Pronger trade, while Tampa Bay got Detroit's first-rounder in an exchange of picks.

4
-- Times that the Islanders have had the No. 1 pick in the draft. Before 2009, the Isles had had the No. 1 pick in 1972 (Billy Harris), 1973 (Denis Potvin) and 2000 (Rick DiPietro).

5
-- Fewest picks by any team in the draft. Boston, Dallas and San Jose all made only five selections. The Sharks, who had traded their first-round choice last summer, were the only one of the three that had to wait until the second round to make a selection -- their first pick was No. 43.

6
-- Teams that owned the No. 26 pick in the opening round. San Jose's first-rounder went to Tampa Bay and then to Ottawa in trades last summer, then to the Islanders in a late-season deal. The Islanders traded it to Columbus Friday night, and the Blue Jackets sent it to Anaheim in another deal before the Ducks used the choice to select forward Kyle Palmieri.

7
-- Swedish players taken in the first round, the most ever in the Entry Draft. Defenseman Victor Hedman, taken No. 2 overall, heads the list. In all, 24 Swedes were taken -- the most of any country outside North America and a jump from the 17 taken last year.

8
-- First pick used on a winger. Dallas took right wing Scott Glennie after the first seven picks were divided among centers (five) and defensemen (two).

10
-- Most picks by any team in the draft. Atlanta, Los Angeles and Nashville all had 10 choices; the Kings actually entered the draft with 14 selections before making a number of trades.

11
-- Countries that had at least one player drafted. Belarus, Denmark, Germany and the United Kingdom each had just one player selected.

 
-- Canadian players who were drafted in the first round. Four of the first five players taken, seven of the first 10 and 11 of the first 15 were born in Canada. In all, there were 102 Canadian-born players selected, down from 119 in 2008.

55
-- U.S.-born players taken in the draft, though none was selected in the top 15 picks. Nick Leddy, a high-school player from Eden Prairie, Minn., became the first American taken when he went No. 16 to the Minnesota Wild. However, the 55 Americans taken were nine more than in 2008.

81
-- First pick made by the Philadelphia Flyers, the last team to make a selection. The Flyers dealt their first-round pick to Anaheim on Friday night in the Chris Pronger trade and had sent their second-rounder to Phoenix at the trade deadline in March. The Flyers are in line to get a late start next year, too -- the Pronger deal cost them a No. 1 pick in 2010.

99
-- Players taken from one of the three major junior leagues in Canada. The Ontario Hockey League led the way with 45 players selected, followed by the Western Hockey League (31) and Quebec Major Junior Hockey League (23)

211 -- Pick used by Montreal to select Finnish junior goaltender Petteri Simila with the final selection of the draft (he was the 210th pick; one selection was disallowed). Being picked last doesn't mean you have no chance to make the NHL -- Detroit defenseman Jonathan Ericsson (No. 291 in 2002) is among the final picks who've made it in the League.