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This Date in Playoff History: April 21

Tuesday, 04.21.2009 / 11:12 AM / 2009 Playoffs Conference Quarterfinals

By Adam Schwartz - NHL.com Staff Writer

1945: Red Wings right wing Eddie Bruneteau scored at 14:06 of overtime in Game 6 of the Stanley Cup Final, tying the series with the Maple Leafs after Toronto had won the first three games of the series. Detroit, however, couldn't complete the miraculous comeback and fell to Toronto, 2-1, in Game 7 giving the Maple Leafs their second Cup in four seasons.

1982: The Canucks clinched their second series victory in franchise history and of the playoff year with a 5-2 win against the Kings in Game 5. Vancouver lost the second game of the series in overtime, which tied the series and could've given the Kings the momentum, but Vancouver came back in Game 3 with an overtime victory of its own when Vancouver defenseman Colin Campbell scored just 1:23 into overtime. The win was the first of two the Canucks got in Los Angeles during the series. The Canucks proceeded to beat Chicago in five games in the next round, but were easily handled by the Islanders in a four-game sweep in the Stanley Cup Final -- the third of four-straight Cups the Islanders would win.

1992:
Boston center Adam Oates beat inexperienced Buffalo goalie Thomas Draper, who had just 34 games of regular-season NHL experience at that point, to give the Bruins a 3-2 overtime victory, tying the series 1-1. Even though Boston would win the next two games of the series, the Sabres rallied to force a Game 7, but the Bruins prevailed. Boston went on to sweep the Canadiens in four games in the next round -- a team which the Bruins have lost 24 of 31 playoff series' against. The next round Boston was swept in four games by the Penguins.

1994: Montreal forwards Gilbert Dionne and Mike Keane scored just six seconds apart in Game 3 of their first-round series against the Bruins, a franchise record and just one second away from tying a League record set by the Red Wings in 1965. Despite the two quick goals, the Canadiens would lose the game, 6-3, giving the Bruins a 2-1 series edge. The Habs came back in Game 4 to tie the series and jumped ahead to take a 3-2 series lead in Game 5 only to have the Bruins win the next two games and eliminated the Canadiens for the second time in four seasons. Dionne's goal was the last of his NHL career, but Keane would  play 10 more NHL seasons and five more with the Manitoba Moose of the American Hockey League after that, winning the Cup two more times.

2000: The Flyers win Game 6 of their second-round series against Pennsylvania-rival Penguins 2-1, advancing to the Eastern Conference Final for the second time in four seasons. Despite winning the series, Philadelphia lost the first two games of the series, but won Games 3 and 4 in overtime to even the series and gain the momentum. This series always will be remembered for Philadelphia forward Keith Primeau's goal at 12:01 of the fifth overtime period in Game 4. Philadelphia, however, didn't fare as well in the next round. Even though they took a stranglehold of the series against the Devils, 3-1, they would lose in seven games, dropping two of the last three games in Philadelphia.

2002: Devils goalie Martin Brodeur recorded his 13th career playoff shutout by blanking the Hurricanes, 4-0, in New Jersey in Game 3 of the first-round series. The win trimmed Carolina's 2-0 series lead to 2-1 and it was the first game of the series to be played at the Meadowlands. New Jersey would tie the series at two when New Jersey right wing Brian Gionta scored the game-winning goal against Carolina goalie Arturs Irbe for the second game in a row, but that was the last win the Devils would get in the series.

Contact Adam Schwartz at aschwartz@nhl.com.
Quote of the Day

A piece of scar tissue breaks off, pinches the nerve, and every time you move your leg it's almost like having a root canal in your stomach and groin.

— Detroit Red Wings center Stephen Weiss on his sports hernia surgery