Welcome |Account|Sign Out 
NEW! SIGN IN WITH YOUR SOCIAL PROFILE
OR
Username or EmailPassword
 
SHARE
Round 2
Round 3
Stanley Cup Final

Canadian junior hockey team capsules

Tuesday, 12.23.2008 / 4:33 PM / News

The Canadian Press

A capsule look at the Canadian team for the world junior hockey championship starting Friday in Ottawa:

Goaltenders

Dustin Tokarski, Watson, Sask. - Consistent, steady and his numbers this season are the best in the Canadian Hockey League. Calm demeanour injects confidence into the players in front of him.

Chet Pickard, Winnipeg - Excellent positioning and mobility. Fills the net at six foot one, 216 pounds. Can run hot and cold, but difficult to beat when he's on his game.

Defencemen

Keith Aulie, Rouleau, Sask. - Six-foot-six frame, plus mobility make him a challenge to beat one-on-one. Not physically punishing, but finishes checks. Aulie doesn't overhandle the puck and moves it quickly.

Ryan Ellis, Freelton, Ont. - Best offensive defenceman in junior hockey despite being just 17. Protects and distributes the puck and doesn't panic. Will quarterback power play.

Cody Goloubef, Oakville, Ont. - Lone college player on the team out of Wisconsin is calm, covers off gaps and doesn't give quarter in the defensive zone. A good skater with quick transition game.

Thomas Hickey, Calgary - Has the charisma and poise required of a team captain. A two-way defenceman who is positionally airtight. Passes the puck quickly out of defensive zone to stay ahead of the forecheck and can also join the rush.

Tyler Myers, Calgary - One of the best skaters in junior hockey even though he's almost six foot eight. A natural athlete who makes the most of his reach and size to stop opposing forwards.

Alex Pietrangelo, King City, Ont. - Has the most NHL experience on the Canadian team after playing eight games with St. Louis. Moves the puck well and his positioning and awareness without it improved during his stint in the NHL.

P.K. Subban, Toronto - An energy defenceman, whose enthusiasm and competitiveness rubs off on his teammates. Strong skater, solid passer and a hard man low in the defensive zone.

Colton Teubert, White Rock, B.C. - A shut-down defenceman for Canada at world under-18 level. Makes opposing scorers pay a price to gain the offensive zone.

Forwards

Jamie Benn, Victoria - A natural finisher around the net, Benn doesn't waste time with the puck and doesn't waste shots. He intends to score when he puts it on net.

Zach Boychuk, Airdrie, Alta. - Flies in off the wing with speed and fools goaltenders with his quick release mid-stride. Can also play a checking role for Canada if required

Patrice Cormier, Cap-Pele, N.B. - The muscle of the Canadian team. Hits hard and wins faceoffs.

Stefan Della Rovere, Maple, Ont. - Has cultivated offensive talents to go with hard-charging game. Difficult for opposing players to contain.

Chris DiDomenico, Woodbridge, Ont. - Versatile forward can play centre or wing and effective on both power play and penalty kill.

Jordan Eberle, Regina - An elite offensive player in the 18-year-old age group, but made the Canadian team because he's developed the defensive side of his game.

Tyler Ennis, Edmonton - A smaller buzzsaw of a player who doesn't quit on the puck and creates scoring chances with his tenacity.

Angelo Esposito, Montreal - Has added power and more determination to a game that includes considerable offensive skills and speed.

Evander Kane, Vancouver - Late addition to team after injury to Dana Tyrell. Just 17, this winger brings a combination of physical play and offensive talent.

Cody Hodgson, Markham, Ont. - Assistant captain at 18 speaks to his maturity. Makes smart decisions at both ends of the ice.

Brett Sonne, Maple Ridge, B.C. - Was always a tough competitor and defensively responsible during his career, but he's blossomed offensively this season to become a contributor at both ends of the ice.

John Tavares, Oakville, Ont. - The best puckhandler of the 2009 NHL draft class. Traffic around the net no impediment to creating scoring chances. Puts pressure on himself to be the star.

I didn't think it would actually work, but it ended up working, so I'm thanking my lucky stars tonight.

— Columbus forward Nick Foligno on scoring the overtime goal after telling the Blue Jackets in the locker room that he would win the game