Welcome |Account|Sign Out 
NEW! SIGN IN WITH YOUR SOCIAL PROFILE
OR
Username or EmailPassword
 
2014 NHL Draft
SHARE

Nine goalies are credited with 11 goals in NHL history

Wednesday, 12.05.2007 / 9:00 AM / NHL Insider

By Dan Rosen - NHL.com Senior Writer

On December 8th, 1987, former Philadelphia Flyers goaltender Ron Hextall was the first goalie in NHL history to score a goal from an actual shot on goal.
Nine different goalies have combined to score 11 NHL goals. Ron Hextall and Martin Brodeur are the only two who have accomplished the rare feat twice. They also are the only two goalies to score in the Stanley Cup Playoffs.

VIDEO: Goalie goal footage

Here is a rundown, in chronological order, of the goals scored by NHL goalies:

Billy Smith, Nov. 28, 1979 -- The former New York Islanders goalie was the first to be credited with an NHL goal when he scored against the Colorado Rockies.

Colorado pulled its goalie after a delayed penalty was called against the Islanders, but Rockies forward Rob Ramage made an errant pass down the length of the ice after a Smith save, and the puck wound up in the Colorado net. Since Smith was the last Islander to touch the puck, he was given credit for the historic goal.

Ron Hextall, Dec. 8, 1987 -- The former Philadelphia Flyers goalie made history when he became the first NHL goalie to score a goal by actually shooting the puck into the net. The goal came with 1:12 left in a 5-2 win over the Boston Bruins at the Spectrum in Philadelphia.

Hextall lifted the puck down the ice. It landed at Boston’s blue line and eventually slid all the way into the open net vacated by Bruins goalie Reggie Lemelin for an extra-attacker.

”I still don’t realize it,” Hextall told reporters the night of his historic goal. “I’ll have to see it on film.”

Ron Hextall, April 11, 1989 -- Hextall replicated his feat two years later by becoming the first NHL goalie to score a goal in a Stanley Cup Playoff game. This one came with 1:02 left against the Washington Capitals, when he flipped the puck the entire length of the ice after gathering it from behind the net.

Rod Langway was the closest Washington player to the puck, but he still trailed it by more than 15 feet before it went in. Even better, this was a short-handed goal and it finished the Flyers’ 8-5 victory in Game 5 of the first round.

“Sports fans anywhere watching this hockey game, you have just witnessed history,” said color commentator Bill Clement in describing the moment on the television broadcast that night.

Chris Osgood, March 6, 1996 -- The Detroit Red Wings goalie became the second goalie in NHL history to shoot the puck into an empty net, in a game against the Hartford Whalers. It was the final goal in a 4-2 victory.

Osgood was attempting to get the puck out of the zone, but he fired it right on goal with 10.4 seconds remaining.

Martin Brodeur, April 17, 1997 -- With his team up by two goals late in a first-round playoff game, the Devils goalie fired the puck the length of the ice and into the net.

It was the second playoff goal ever scored by an NHL goalie, and it came with 44.6 seconds left in Game 1 of the Eastern Conference Quarterfinals against Montreal, capping a 5-2 victory.

Damian Rhodes, Jan. 2, 1999 -- The former Ottawa Senators goalie became the first in the NHL to score a goal and record a shutout in the same game.

With Ottawa leading the New Jersey Devils, 1-0, Rhodes was the last Senator to touch the puck before Devils defenseman Lyle Odelein inadvertently shot it into his own net during a delayed penalty.

Brodeur was off the ice due to the delayed penalty, but Odelein’s pass eluded Scott Niedermayer and Dave Andreychuk and went the length of the ice to give Ottawa a 2-0 lead. Rhodes ended up with 30 saves in the 6-0 win.

Martin Brodeur, Feb. 15, 2000 -- Brodeur was credited with his second career goal because he was the last player on the ice to touch the puck before Philadelphia Flyers forward Simon Gagne accidentally put it into his own net during a delayed penalty on the Devils.

New Jersey goaltender Martin Brodeur is tied with Ron Hextall for the most career goals by a goalie.

Brodeur had trapped the puck behind his net, stopping an attempted wrap-around.

Jose Theodore, Jan. 2, 2001 -- On the second anniversary of Rhodes’ goal, the former Montreal Canadians goalie became the second goaltender to score a goal and capture a shutout.

Theodore’s backhanded clearing attempt actually wound up in the New York Islanders goal because it was recently vacated by John Vanbiesbrouck. The Canadians won, 3-0, and Theodore made 32 saves.

Evgeni Nabokov, March 10, 2002 -- The San Jose Sharks goalie became the first European to score in the NHL, when from the top of his own crease he fired and found an empty against the Vancouver Canucks with 47.2 seconds remaining in the Sharks’ 7-4 win.

“I saw the defensemen split so I was just like, ‘I’m going to go for it,’ ” Nabokov told reporters that night, “and it went in. I’m going to lie if I say it wasn’t exciting.”

Mika Noronen, Feb. 14, 2004 -- The former Buffalo Sabres goalie was credited with his goal when Toronto’s Robert Reichel accidentally put the puck into his own net, capping the Sabres’ 6-4 victory. Noronen was the last Sabre to touch the puck.

Reichel tried a pass from behind Noronen, but the puck went untouched all the way down the ice and into the goal. Buffalo’s Dmitri Kalinin was announced as the goal scorer, but Noronen learned it was his goal 10 minutes after the game was over.

“Maybe I’ll get to hear my name next time,” Noronen told the media after hearing the news that the goal belonged to him, not Kalinin.

Chris Mason, April 15, 2006 -- The Nashville Predators goalie was credited with the goal in a 5-1 victory over Phoenix when Coyotes forward Geoff Sanderson shot the puck into his own net on a delayed penalty midway through the third period.

Mason was the last Nashville player to touch the puck.

“Someone else should have received it. I don’t even like counting one like that as a goal,” Mason told reporters afterward. “I’d much rather shoot one and saucer it down and in. Maybe when I retire I can tell people that’s how it happened.”

Quote of the Day

I just think about how much it hurts. The feelings aren't going to go away, probably never. It's just something that sticks with you for a long time.

— San Jose forward Logan Couture to The Canadian Press on the Sharks' first-round loss to the Kings after taking a 3-0 series lead