Penguins' Crosby pleased with how wrist has healed

Friday, 08.15.2014 / 6:59 PM NHL.com

Pittsburgh Penguins forward Sidney Crosby said Friday he is pleased with the way his injured right wrist has responded to treatment.

"It's good," Crosby told The Associated Press in Estero, Fla., where he has been working out. "You want to see how things progress throughout the summer once you start skating and get back to that regular routine. You want to see how it reacts, so I'm happy with the way it's gone."

The Penguins in early July said Crosby had been receiving treatment for a wrist injury he sustained last season. Crosby's agent, Pat Brisson, told the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette that Crosby opted for an injection rather than surgery, which was not ruled out. Brisson said Crosby was injured in March.

Penguins general manager Jim Rutherford said in July that Crosby would be ready for training camp.

After leading the NHL in scoring during the regular season with 104 points, Crosby had one goal and eight points in 13 Stanley Cup Playoff games. He did not have a point in the Penguins' final three games, all losses, after they took a 3-1 series lead against the New York Rangers in the Eastern Conference Second Round.

During and after the playoffs Crosby said he was healthy, but a source told the Post-Gazette that Crosby "did play with a terrible wrist."

"We're going to have some new faces in the dressing room trying to get that momentum and get a fresh start," Crosby said. "We're not happy with the way things ended last year."

The Penguins will open training camp with a new coach, Mike Johnston, and new general manager, Rutherford. Pittsburgh also traded forward James Neal and let forward Jussi Jokinen and defensemen Matt Niskanen and Brooks Orpik leave as free agents.

"The organization is committed to winning," Crosby said. "We have opportunities as players to be successful every year. As far as the team is concerned, I think we're in a great position to win every year. We'll do our best to do our part."

Crosby participated in workouts with NHL players, including Colorado Avalanche forward Nathan MacKinnon, also a native of Cole Harbour, Nova Scotia.

"I can relate to a lot of things he's going through," Crosby said. "He's handled it pretty well. You see the way he's playing the first year with the Calder Trophy. He's just going to get better. It's a matter of being there for him."

Crosby was awarded the Hart Trophy as the NHL's Most Valuable Player for the second time in his career on June 24 in Las Vegas. He also won the Ted Lindsay Award (formerly the Lester B. Pearson Award) for the second straight season and third time in his career.

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