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Hartman looks to impress USA Hockey brass

Tuesday, 12.04.2012 / 1:57 PM | Mike G. Morreale  - NHL.com Staff Writer

In addition to top draft-eligible defenseman Seth Jones, one other standout prospect was invited to the U.S. National Junior Team selection camp at the New York Rangers' training facility in Greenburgh, N.Y., from Dec. 16-18.

Ryan Hartman, a 5-foot-11, 187-pound forward from West Dundee, Ill., is also on the radar of USA Hockey's coaching and managerial team -- and for good reason.

"I really liked his camp in Lake Placid [in August]," U.S. National Team coach Phil Housley said. "He's the kind of guy who plays at both ends of the rink, can skate, and can change the momentum of a game with a big hit."

In 55 games with the U.S. Under-18 National Team Development Program last season, Hartman had 15 goals, 38 points and 116 penalty minutes. In six games at the U-18 World Hockey Championship, he had two goals, six points and a plus-9 rating for the United States.

"He's a player that can play center or wing, so that to me shows the range he has as a player," Housley said. "I've heard nothing but great things about him as far as his development, and you see it in his point totals up to this point."

Hartman is certainly the type of player every international team coach might be looking for in a short tournament.

In his first year with the Plymouth Whalers of the Ontario Hockey League in 2012-13, Hartman is second on the team with 27 points, including 11 goals. He also has 70 PIM and a plus-6 rating.

"Ryan is one of the best skaters in this year's draft class," NHL Central Scouting's Chris Edwards told NHL.com. "He has a long smooth stride and his agility, acceleration and speed are all excellent."

Hartman is ranked No. 11 on Central Scouting's preliminary list of skaters competing in the OHL.

"He's not the biggest guy, but he shows no fear of getting involved and battles for the puck," Edwards continued. "He can hit hard and is aggressive on the forecheck. He sees the ice well, gets the puck through traffic with creative passes and offers a very good shot that he gets off quickly."

Follow Mike Morreale on Twitter at: @mike_morreale

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