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At the Rink blog

Tortorella: No diving, whining on Canucks

Thursday, 10.24.2013 / 1:32 PM

By Dan Rosen - NHL.com Senior Writer / 2013-2014 At the Rink Blog

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2013-2014 At the Rink Blog
Tortorella: No diving, whining on Canucks

NEWARK, N.J. -- The Vancouver Canucks haven't been getting a lot of opportunities to get their slumping power play going and coach John Tortorella has a theory as to why the calls in his team's favor have been so infrequent.

They're tied for the most games played in the NHL with 11, but they're 26th in power play opportunities with 29.

"I know the reputation from the outside looking in, when I wasn't coaching here, everybody outside thought Vancouver dove and did some whining," Tortorella said. "Our team is not going to dive. Our team has already been talked to. We're not going to dive. I don't think there is much whining going on either.

"Now, I'm certainly not trying to accuse the League or the refs of that, but I know there's been a reputation. I've been in the League long enough, and sometimes that hangs around too. I guess it's my chance to say we're going to be an honest team, we're trying to be an honest team, and I hope we get some … calls along the way."

The Canucks have not been called for diving yet this season.

"We don't want to be known as a team that dives," Vancouver defenseman Kevin Bieksa said. "We're too good of a team to be doing that."

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Quote of the Day

It's pretty crazy, but believe me when I say we didn't draft these players with the mindset we had to because they had good hockey-playing dads. It just turned out that way. But we're certainly glad they're a part of our organization.

— Arizona Coyotes director of amateur scouting Tim Bernhardt regarding the coincidence that six of the organization's top prospects are sons of former NHL players